Munich

Munich Travel Guide

Outdoor lovers looking for things to do in Munich should start with the Englischer Garten, Munich’s largest green space, which is even bigger than New York’s Central Park. Take a walk on one of the park’s pathways, row lazily in the lake, or rent a bike to see more of the vast space. For travelers intent on incorporating the city’s beer scene into all things to do in Munich, you can even rent a “beer bike,” to indulge while pedaling through the city. For an afternoon of people-watching, head to Prinzregentenstrasse, where surfers hit the waves at all times of the year.

For nightlife, the Kunstpark is a formal industrial area now packed with bars and clubs. Night-owls are no longer are at a loss for what to do in Munich after Oktoberfest tents close at 11pm. Bar-hop from hip hop clubs to dance music discos, and seek out whatever vibe you please.

Wondering what to do in Munich to celebrate another aspect of Germany’s culture? Visit the BMW Welt, the only BMW museum in the world. Explore the brand's history and even test-drive simulation cars.

Also known as Asamkirche, the church at Christmas is a Baroque jewel redolent of pine boughs and frankincense.

Lucky Lufthansa passengers with first-class tickets or rewards program ID can take advantage of one of the biggest and highest-tech lounges on the Continent.

Germany’s big name in international fashion, known for its sober, clean-lined business and leisure wear, has multiple boutiques in the airport that feature a range of Hugo Boss, Boss Women, Boss Black, and Boss Orange clothing (smart, black suits and candy-colored dresses from about $600 and $450

Located 15 minutes northeast of the city center, the Allianz Arena is home to Munich’s two major soccer teams, FC Bayern and TSV 1860.

One-of-a-kind shop with art and furnishings made of 100 percent wool felt.

Being stuck between continents and time zones is the perfect time to indulge in that old-school male tradition: a true barbershop shave. Brants offers haircuts, shaves, and manicures (for men only) and uses American Crew products. Shaves are $32.

The seventh-story, glassed-in observation deck offers a nearly bird’s-eye view of the busy runway. For stranded travelers, the terrace is good for at least a half-hour’s worth of plane-spotting entertainment. Admission is $3; open daily 8 a.m.–10 p.m.

Glyptothek, a Neoclassical temple built in the 19th century houses a collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. The best known of these is the Barberini Faun, of course, a kind of proto-gay icon depicting a naked youth asleep on a panther skin.

This famous beer hall has traditionally-dressed servers touting large steins of beer — even with breakfast. Hofbräuhaus' roots date back to 1589 as the city's first brewery, and the interior has some wooden tables and chairs that are more than a century old. Three floors can accommodate up to 3,5

For years, the German label with the French name had a slogan—“Unfortunately expensive”—that defined its niche perhaps too sharply. Fabrics are rich, colors conservative (navy blue and gray dominate), and the tailoring modern.

Located 30 minutes northeast of downtown, Munich International is among the busiest airports in Europe and serves as a major hub for Lufthansa and Star Alliance airlines.

Situated in the Kunstareal (art quarter), the Alte Pinakothek museum is home to one of the world’s finest collections of Old Master paintings, dating from the 14th century to the 18th.

The airport-as-spa-day theme finds its apotheosis here.

The big open space atop the long Lufthansa check-in desk is home to an in-house art gallery, which features a changing cast of Munich-based artists. The endless white walls are an ideal context for big-scale canvases—and you’re not likely to see these artists anywhere else.

Housed in two adjoining buildings in the Allstadt district, this contemporary art gallery is one of the largest in Germany. Originally established in 1851, the Bayerischer Kunstgewerbe-Verein (Bavarian Arts & Crafts Association) was founded to promote the work of local craftspeople.