Munich + Bavaria

Things to do in Munich + Bavaria

Lucky Lufthansa passengers with first-class tickets or rewards program ID can take advantage of one of the biggest and highest-tech lounges on the Continent.

The museum has the world's largest collection, at around 75,000 objects of modern and contemporary design.

The seventh-story, glassed-in observation deck offers a nearly bird’s-eye view of the busy runway. For stranded travelers, the terrace is good for at least a half-hour’s worth of plane-spotting entertainment. Admission is $3; open daily 8 a.m.–10 p.m.

This famous beer hall has traditionally-dressed servers touting large steins of beer — even with breakfast. Hofbräuhaus' roots date back to 1589 as the city's first brewery, and the interior has some wooden tables and chairs that are more than a century old. Three floors can accommodate up to 3,5

Herzog & de Meuron's complex offers a new spin on the 19th-century shopping arcade, its passageways and interior quadrangles distinguished by hanging plants, warped walls, and a sculptural sphere by the artist Olafur Eliasson.

The big open space atop the long Lufthansa check-in desk is home to an in-house art gallery, which features a changing cast of Munich-based artists. The endless white walls are an ideal context for big-scale canvases—and you’re not likely to see these artists anywhere else.

Housed in two adjoining buildings in the Allstadt district, this contemporary art gallery is one of the largest in Germany. Originally established in 1851, the Bayerischer Kunstgewerbe-Verein (Bavarian Arts & Crafts Association) was founded to promote the work of local craftspeople.

A car-delivery center accessorized with restaurants and shops. The swooping glass-and-steel leviathan, designed by Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, looks like a spaceship touching down.

Low-stakes gambling (slot machines and video card games) are legal in Germany, but in typical German fashion, the airport location of this casino chain is spotless to the point of being sterile. Video slots and card games accept bets starting at one euro.

A bustling boîte in the fashionable Glockenbach neighborhood where a herd of wall-mounted plastic animals is the primary décor.

Internationally renowned jeweler that also makes objects in iron and rock crystal.

A car-delivery center accessorized with restaurants and shops. The swooping glass-and-steel leviathan, designed by Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, looks like a spaceship touching down.