Munich + Bavaria

Things to do in Munich + Bavaria

The big open space atop the long Lufthansa check-in desk is home to an in-house art gallery, which features a changing cast of Munich-based artists. The endless white walls are an ideal context for big-scale canvases—and you’re not likely to see these artists anywhere else.

Housed in two adjoining buildings in the Allstadt district, this contemporary art gallery is one of the largest in Germany. Originally established in 1851, the Bayerischer Kunstgewerbe-Verein (Bavarian Arts & Crafts Association) was founded to promote the work of local craftspeople.

A car-delivery center accessorized with restaurants and shops. The swooping glass-and-steel leviathan, designed by Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, looks like a spaceship touching down.

Low-stakes gambling (slot machines and video card games) are legal in Germany, but in typical German fashion, the airport location of this casino chain is spotless to the point of being sterile. Video slots and card games accept bets starting at one euro.

Internationally renowned jeweler that also makes objects in iron and rock crystal.

A bustling boîte in the fashionable Glockenbach neighborhood where a herd of wall-mounted plastic animals is the primary décor.

A car-delivery center accessorized with restaurants and shops. The swooping glass-and-steel leviathan, designed by Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, looks like a spaceship touching down.

Germany’s big name in international fashion, known for its sober, clean-lined business and leisure wear, has multiple boutiques in the airport that feature a range of Hugo Boss, Boss Women, Boss Black, and Boss Orange clothing (smart, black suits and candy-colored dresses from about $600 and $450

Olympic Pedigree: 1972 Games’ home to track and field, boxing, weight lifting, archery, modern pentathlon, swimming, wrestling, cycling, fencing, handball, gymnastics, judo, soccer, and volleyball.

 

One-of-a-kind shop with art and furnishings made of 100 percent wool felt.

Once per decade since 1634, the Bavarian village of Oberammergau has put on the Passion Play—a performance that recounts the life of Jesus. The next show is in 2010. Tickets are hard to get, but are included on itineraries from Tauck.

For years, the German label with the French name had a slogan—“Unfortunately expensive”—that defined its niche perhaps too sharply. Fabrics are rich, colors conservative (navy blue and gray dominate), and the tailoring modern.