Morocco Travel Guide

Otherwise known as the Weaver's Market, feral cats and vendors selling hangers are mixed with vendors who sell to Barneys New York.

Among the oldest and most famous parfumerie in the Muslim world.

One of Guéliz’s newest boutiques, Moor, is the creation of Yann Dobry (who also owns the stylish little shop Akbar Delights, in the medina). Dobry’s new outpost, hung with distinctive lacquered lanterns, features his beautifully embroidered linen, silk, and cotton tunics.

At the newly opened Arganza, you’ll find shelves of argan oil—derived from a native tree—which is known as “Moroccan liquid gold” for its ability to diminish dry skin and wrinkles.

Visit the Dar Batha Museum to see its impressive collection of pottery, antique instruments, and Fassi embroidery.

The ambience may be initially inauspicious, but inside, the goods, culled from all over the country, are cheap and first-rate: spice holders, hand-painted cups from Fez, inlaid boxes, miniature teapots, and more.

The shop is full of exquisite embroidered table linens.

This tiny boutique Beldi dresses some of Marrakesh’s most fashionable residents in linen shirts, mandarin-collared cashmere jackets, and embroidered silk caftans.

The Art Deco cinema was saved by local artists in the community as part of a larger effort to save Tangier's historic buildings.

A market of straw furniture and baskets; custom orders welcome.

Place Vendôme carries top-quality Moroccan leather goods, from $10 men’s wallets to $200 jackets.

Sign the kids up for lessons at this little surf school. Their instructors, all locals, will be the first link to the country’s culture.