Montreal

Montreal Travel Guide

This neighborhood wine bar has a stylish décor that evokes a ‘60s-era Danish living room (Wegner-style chairs, teak bookcases), plus a lively atmosphere (and live piano music on Thursday nights).

Original Debut: Home to a fading vaudeville scene when it opened in 1913, the Imperial became a movie house in 1934 when it was leased to Léo-Ernest Ouimet (owner of the Ouimetoscope, the first movie theater in Canada).

Yvonne and Douglas Mandel, pioneers of the new Vieux, showcase their sharply tailored menswear here.

The historic heart of the city, Old Montreal is a portside hamlet of narrow cobblestoned streets and handsome stone buildings dating from the 18th and 19th centuries, along with a handful from the 17th.

At the city’s north end, Outremont is home to the city’s tony Francophones, and its main drag, Avenue Laurier Ouest, is one of Montreal’s main shopping and dining destinations.

Proof that Montreal is an epicurean’s dream: this exquisitely ordered kitchenware store in Outremont’s poshest shopping neighborhood.

The shop specializes in underground comics and illustrated novels, including titles written and produced by the store’s own publishing house.

In the western suburb of Point St. Charles, this 1668 farmstead—with a handsome stone house, outbuildings, and surrounding gardens—has been transformed into a living history museum. It was originally presided over by Marguerite Bourgeoys, founder of the Congregation of Notre Dame.

Set in the often-narrow streets of Old Montreal, said to be some of Canada’s most haunted, these English- and French-language walking tours highlight spirits from the city’s past. Taking place in the east and west sides of the city, tours run during the summer and around Halloween.

Every year, during the first week of July, Montreal puts on this music celebration. Some acts have included Emmylou Harris, Paul Simon, and Mali's Amadou et Mariam, many of which play for free on outdoor states downtown.

The shop features a well-curated assortment of clothing and artifacts

Designed by New York architect James O’Donnell, the Gothic Revival-style Notre-Dame Basilica faces Place d'Armes in Old Montreal. Although completed in 1829, the church later added its two towers a decade later—the western tower holds one giant bell and the eastern a 10-bell carillon.

Known as the Plateau, this hip, vibrant, edgy community is Montreal’s answer to Manhattan’s Greenwich Village and Lower East Side.

From the same owners as Whiskey Café, Dominion Square Tavern serves a French-Canadian menu and house-made items by chef Érik Dupuis. The original chandelier and terrazzo floors have seen the space used as everything from a 1927 hotel restaurant to one of the city’s first gay bars.