Montreal

Montreal Travel Guide

Once you have the gourmet accoutrements from the Les Touilleurs kitchenware store, cab it up to Little Italy and this enormous food market, which is the city’s culinary epicenter. Here, you can stop by the William J.

This eclectic little boutique/art gallery showcases paintings by owner Lysanne Pepin, quirky jewelry, and a handful of well-priced bohemian women’s clothing lines, including its own Espace Couture label.

Historically home to the city’s working-class, English-speaking black community, the gentrifying, still-off-the-tourist-map neighborhood that gave rise to Montreal’s famed jazz scene is now attracting attention for its hip new restaurants.

Rue Saint-Denis, up in the Plateau, is the prettiest shopping street in the city, with pint-size boutiques tucked into gabled houses. At this basement-level (yet somehow light-filled) store, brothers André and Lambert Gratton curate a smart selection of mid-century housewares and furniture.

In Montreal, where interior shops tend to cater to either traditionalists or cutting-edge Modernists, Celadon Collection bridges the gap between stodgy and avant-garde perfectly.

Set on an otherwise unappealing stretch of Rue Sainte-Catherine, the industrial-looking Belgo Building is an inauspicious hub for the city’s contemporary art scene. Inside, the building is brimming with small galleries, some of which also serve as artists’ workshops.

Les Tam Tams is a free music festival held on rainless Sundays from May through September; it attracts drummers, dancers, vendors, and curious visitors.

Original Debut: Home to a fading vaudeville scene when it opened in 1913, the Imperial became a movie house in 1934 when it was leased to Léo-Ernest Ouimet (owner of the Ouimetoscope, the first movie theater in Canada).

This neighborhood wine bar has a stylish décor that evokes a ‘60s-era Danish living room (Wegner-style chairs, teak bookcases), plus a lively atmosphere (and live piano music on Thursday nights).

Yvonne and Douglas Mandel, pioneers of the new Vieux, showcase their sharply tailored menswear here.

The historic heart of the city, Old Montreal is a portside hamlet of narrow cobblestoned streets and handsome stone buildings dating from the 18th and 19th centuries, along with a handful from the 17th.

At the city’s north end, Outremont is home to the city’s tony Francophones, and its main drag, Avenue Laurier Ouest, is one of Montreal’s main shopping and dining destinations.

Proof that Montreal is an epicurean’s dream: this exquisitely ordered kitchenware store in Outremont’s poshest shopping neighborhood.

The shop specializes in underground comics and illustrated novels, including titles written and produced by the store’s own publishing house.