Montreal

Montreal Travel Guide

Fans of vintage clothing shouldn’t miss this 15-year-old shop for its well-curated selection of designer hats, scarves, and party dresses from the 40’s to the 70’s.

Step inside this tiny chocolatier and the powerful aromas of caramel, spice, milk, and yes, chocolate are as comforting as stepping back into your mother’s kitchen—though we doubt she was turning out such haute treats.

Montreal has great bike trails throughout the city and along the water. The best of them is the one that follows the Lachine Canal for about nine miles, from the old city to the western suburbs.

Designed by Marius Dufresne and completed in 1914, the five-story Maisonneuve Market is located in its namesake district. Although historically a daily market, from the 1960s to 1995 there was a police office and cultural center in the Beaux-Arts building.

Entering the stylish Whisky Lounge is a little like stepping (one imagines) into a Havana lounge, circa 1952. It’s not just the real Cuban cigars—you’re in Canada, after all—being sold and smoked in the clubby back-room salon.

The brewing tradition is alive and well in Quebec, nowhere more so than at this excellent, nothing-but-the-basics microbrewery just a few blocks east of Laurier’s tony boutiques—far enough away, that is, to maintain its authenticity.

Once just a pet project of insect collector Georges Brossard, the Insectarium officially opened in 1990 within the Montreal Botanical Garden. More than 150,000 arthropods—of which insects are a sub-group—are on display at the museum.

Just to the east of downtown, Montreal’s gay village has terraced restaurants and clubs along Rue Saint-Denis (which runs through the Latin Quarter), and buzzing gay bars to the east on Rue Sainte-Catherine.

This traditionally working-class western suburb has several surviving historic sights, including the lovely Maison Saint-Gabriel.

Eclectic Mile End space that's one part antiques shop and one part gallery.

Try to catch a performance by the Mittenstrings, an up-and-coming Montreal phenomenon.

To say that François Beauregard is a master of the simple, cotton-knit shirt is not to denigrate his design skills in any way. Inside his Saint-Laurent boutique, the shirts run from straightforward tanks to dressed-up tees that work equally well with suits or jeans.

The kooky sister establishment to bar Plan B, Bily Kun hangs mounted ostrich heads along its 20-foot-high walls by way of decoration.

An antiques and curios shop opened in 1975, Arthur Quentin has since expanded to offer housewares, accessories, clothing, cookware, and other decorative items.