Montreal Travel Guide

This traditionally working-class western suburb has several surviving historic sights, including the lovely Maison Saint-Gabriel.

Eclectic Mile End space that's one part antiques shop and one part gallery.

To say that François Beauregard is a master of the simple, cotton-knit shirt is not to denigrate his design skills in any way. Inside his Saint-Laurent boutique, the shirts run from straightforward tanks to dressed-up tees that work equally well with suits or jeans.

Try to catch a performance by the Mittenstrings, an up-and-coming Montreal phenomenon.

The kooky sister establishment to bar Plan B, Bily Kun hangs mounted ostrich heads along its 20-foot-high walls by way of decoration.

An antiques and curios shop opened in 1975, Arthur Quentin has since expanded to offer housewares, accessories, clothing, cookware, and other decorative items.

The supermarket is the winner of the People's Choice Award for design.

Close to the bike paths along the Lachine Canal, Le Marche Atwater pieces together a farmers’ market atmosphere from a mix of pastry shops, chocolatiers, and flower stalls.

p>Italian Canadians, Montreal’s largest ethnic group, originally settled in this far-north neighborhood after WWII. Italian is still spoken here, and you’ll find the Marché Jean-Talon, one of the best public food markets in the city.

This serene, four-floor luxury department store, housed in a beautifully restored Art Deco building within the mansion-lined block known as the Golden Square Mile, is a veritable candy store for fashionistas.

Stop in at this 2009-opened boutique to pick up cult clothing brands Supra and Elm, plus works by up-and-coming Montreal artists.

For a deeper look at Canadian art, don’t miss the Beaux-Arts museum in the heart of downtown’s Golden Square Mile.

The oldest public market in Montreal, the Lachine Market dates to the 1840’s. The farmers’ market became a permanent market in 1909, and the bulk of items on sale are still basics like local cheeses, fresh breads, and garden vegetables.

Evidence that Montreal designers can compete on the world’s stage: the glorious interior of Pullman, which merges mid-century modernism (polished wooden tables, stone floors, and a palette of gray, black, and cream) with a hint of 21st-century baroque (a multitiered wine-glass and champagne-flute