Montreal

Restaurants in Montreal

As one of North America’s most diverse and cosmopolitan cities, restaurants in Montreal run the gamut from charming Parisian patisseries to cutting-edge fine dining establishments, upscale steakhouses, Jewish delis, and small local eateries serving cuisines from all around Europe, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America. You certainly cannot visit Montreal without sampling the local favorite, poutine – French fries smothered in cheese curds and gravy – served throughout the city at gourmet establishments and fast-food joints alike. The character of Montreal restaurants varyiesby neighborhood – the Plateau Mont-Royal is a hotspot for trendy fusion fare and hipster bars in equal measure, while downtown Montreal and the Old Port house some of the most upscale establishments– but you’ll be hard-pressed to leave the city feeling blasé about Montreal’s dining scene.

Some of the best restaurants in Montreal include Le Lapin Sauté, which specializes in rabbit dishes like rabbit cassoulet and rabbit pie, served in a rustic dining room in Old Montreal; Garde Manger, which draws a mixed crowd of hipsters and gourmands and serves impeccable haute cuisine like lobster risotto, short ribs and snow crabs in an upscale and urbane setting; Au Pied de Cochon, which offers up pork, duck and steak dishes created by an award winning chef; and Queue de Cheval, which serves a dozen varieties of steak and is worth the extravagant expense. Don’t forget to stop by Saint Viateur Bagel, which has several outposts around the city, to sample Montreal’s famous bagels, dense and chewy and jostling with New York’s own doughy style of bagel for supremacy.

Set among Vieux-Montréal’s cobblestoned lanes, this eatery is marked only by the antler-and-fish crest hanging outside the door (appropriate, since chasse et pêche means “hunting and fishing”).

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.

Located in the Mile End area, Wilensky’s Light Lunch serves unfussy sandwiches and fountain sodas. Opened in 1932, the restaurant was made an icon by Mordecai Richler’s The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959).

The Poutine (fries with gravy and cheese) come in 25 varieties starting at $4.00.

A bring-your-own-wine restaurant, L’Atelier combines market produce with comfort food by chefs Patrick Garneau and Benjamin Fortier. The Mile End restaurant is rustic with unfinished wood tables, logs sliced and stacked to resemble a woodpile, and photo portraits of local farmers.

Opened in 1928, this kosher-style Jewish deli marinates its meat for 10 full days before hot-smoking it. The preservative-free beef brisket (similar to pastrami) is ordered by the fat content: either fat, medium-fat, medium, or lean.

Located in the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighborhood, Cosmos was opened in 1967 by Crete-born Tony Koulakis. The eatery has just 11 stools, where customers sit to enjoy the greasy-spoon-style meals.

You will recognize Abu Elias, a large Lebanese takeaway grill and grocery, not by the name painted on the window but by its always-crowded corner parking lot.

This lively restaurant, manned by chef Martin Picard, has earned a cultlike following both within the city and abroad for its obsessive (and inventive) preparations of all things meat.

This French-style deli-cum-bistro in Old Montreal is cluttered with chalkboards, Paris street signs, vintage canned goods, and faux meat hanging from the ceiling.

Happy hour starts at noon at this 12-seat luncheonette.

Réservoir's large arched windows open in summer and its second-floor terrace overlooks raised-bed gardens and iron lampposts along cobbled Duluth Avenue. Bare wooden tables and beer vats fill the brasserie-style brewpub.

Set in Montreal’s Little Italy, home to a large Italian population since the 19th-century, Caffe San Simeon has been making espresso, lattes, and cappuccinos since 1996. An Italian flag hangs in the window of the café, which serves drinks in colorful espresso cups and tall glass tumblers.

Located in the city's Mile End district, Jun-I serves fresh fish and inventive Japanese-style dishes from namesake chef Junichi Ikematsu.

Traditional French cuisine is the specialty at Chez Gautier, which has been a Montreal staple since the 1970's. The bistro is styled after a Parisian brasserie, with leather benches, dark woodwork, and brass pillars.