Montreal

Restaurants in Montreal

One part restaurant, one part late-night bar, Garde Manger offers innovative seafood and a seat at the hottest party in town.

Although the Sparrow has changed chefs since its 2009 opening, the Mile End restaurant still offers all-you-can-eat brunch. The family-style spread includes French toast, cheese and zucchini frittata, balsamic chutney, and fruit brioche.

Located in the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighborhood, Cosmos was opened in 1967 by Crete-born Tony Koulakis. The eatery has just 11 stools, where customers sit to enjoy the greasy-spoon-style meals.

You will recognize Abu Elias, a large Lebanese takeaway grill and grocery, not by the name painted on the window but by its always-crowded corner parking lot.

At this loungey locale, Chef Alex Rolland's duck breast with Japanese eggplant and black cherry sauce is a perfect stand-in for Christmas goose.

This neighborhood bistro hits all the marks of Nouvelle Montréal cuisine: taxidermy in the dining room, chalkboard of nose-to-tail specials, and scruffy hipster chefs in baseball caps.

This lively restaurant, manned by chef Martin Picard, has earned a cultlike following both within the city and abroad for its obsessive (and inventive) preparations of all things meat.

Chef Michel Ross creates a dynamic menu in this neighborhood hideaway.

Opened in 2007, Les Cons Servent is a play on words, alluding to the bistro's home-canned preserves, conserves, and pickles that are stacked on ceiling-high shelves in the gray-tone dining room.

If you think you love the New York bagel, your loyalty might be tested by Montreal’s small, dense, and sweet version of the boiled classic. The best place to sample them lies beyond the perpetually steamed windows of this tiny storefront, whose owners have been turning out bagels since 1919.

DNA

To create his Canadian cuisine, chef Derek Dammann draws ingredients from all parts of the animal as well as what's in-season at the market.

This French-style deli-cum-bistro in Old Montreal is cluttered with chalkboards, Paris street signs, vintage canned goods, and faux meat hanging from the ceiling.

Happy hour starts at noon at this 12-seat luncheonette.

Opened in 1998 as a bakery but then expanded into a café, Olive & Gourmando has a menu of sandwiches served on homemade bread, pastries encasing Valrhona chocolate, and housemade ricotta.