Montreal

Restaurants in Montreal

Located in the city's Mile End district, Jun-I serves fresh fish and inventive Japanese-style dishes from namesake chef Junichi Ikematsu.

Laloux is a Parisian-style bistro in the Plateau neighborhood that offers all of its wines by the glass. The chefs use certified-sustainable seafood and seasonal produce to create menus that change daily.

A secret marinade and wood-charcoal grilling make the Portuguese barbecued chicken Rotisserie Portugalia's signature dish. The chicken has a loyal following and must be ordered an hour in advance.

For eight years, chef Laurent Godbout has been putting a delicious spin on classics (try his pan-seared sea bass with squid-ink risotto, scallops, and a chorizo cream sauce) in this Old Montreal dining room—and he hasn’t missed a beat yet.

Ask for a table on the shaded patio and order a bowl of vegetarian chili and a hearty sandwich.

Traditional French cuisine is the specialty at Chez Gautier, which has been a Montreal staple since the 1970's. The bistro is styled after a Parisian brasserie, with leather benches, dark woodwork, and brass pillars.

Set among Vieux-Montréal’s cobblestoned lanes, this eatery is marked only by the antler-and-fish crest hanging outside the door (appropriate, since chasse et pêche means “hunting and fishing”).

Peruvian-born chef and owner of Laurier-West restaurant Raza, Mario Navarrete Jr. opened Madre, his second restaurant, in 2007.

Dépanneur le Pick Up is one of Montreal’s many convenience stores, turned quirky lunch counter and diet-sensitive bakery. Seating is available near the indoor counter or on the back patio. Along with beer and candy bars, Le Pick Up sells breakfasts made on St.

It may be a little contrarian to recommend the Main, a 35-year-old smoked-meat lunch counter on Saint-Laurent, over the more legendary Schwartz’s just across the street. But that’s the point.

Hand-rolled gnocchi made with no potato, only ricotta, and Grana Padano cheeses, and osso buco with red wine risotto are chef Graziella Batista's signature northern Italian dishes at her namesake restaurant.

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.