Montreal

Restaurants in Montreal

Dépanneur le Pick Up is one of Montreal’s many convenience stores, turned quirky lunch counter and diet-sensitive bakery. Seating is available near the indoor counter or on the back patio. Along with beer and candy bars, Le Pick Up sells breakfasts made on St.

Peruvian-born chef and owner of Laurier-West restaurant Raza, Mario Navarrete Jr. opened Madre, his second restaurant, in 2007.

It may be a little contrarian to recommend the Main, a 35-year-old smoked-meat lunch counter on Saint-Laurent, over the more legendary Schwartz’s just across the street. But that’s the point.

Hand-rolled gnocchi made with no potato, only ricotta, and Grana Padano cheeses, and osso buco with red wine risotto are chef Graziella Batista's signature northern Italian dishes at her namesake restaurant.

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.

Chef-owners Frédéric Morin and David McMillan are the mavericks behind Joe Beef, a delightfully disheveled counterpoint to the city’s often overstyled restaurants.

Just steps from the Jean-Talon farmers’ market, diners sit at a counter and watch chef-owners Mathieu Cloutier and Jean-Philippe St.-Denis cook up whatever’s freshest. (With only one other employee, the chefs are also the restaurant’s servers, sommeliers, and dishwashers.)

Rotisserie Romados is known for its wood-charcoal-grilled Portuguese chicken served under a mountain of French fries. At the small corner restaurant, which opened in 1994, cooks use a paintbrush to drizzle the chicken, rice, and seasoned fries with spiced chili oil.

The Poutine (fries with gravy and cheese) come in 25 varieties starting at $4.00.

Located in the Mile End area, Wilensky’s Light Lunch serves unfussy sandwiches and fountain sodas. Opened in 1932, the restaurant was made an icon by Mordecai Richler’s The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959).

Open since 1980, the restaurant is still the spot for expertly prepared French classics such as the generous pot-au-feu or the citrusy octopus-and-lentil salad.

A cheerful after-work crowd heads to this trendy wine bar for locally brewed McKeown cider and tasty bar snacks like grilled calamari and olives marinated with fennel.

Greek seafood restaurant Milos opened in Montreal in 1979 and was chef-owner Costas Spiliadis’ first eatery, preceding locations in New York, Athens, and Las Vegas. Fresh seafood ranges from sardines and octopus to Gulf shrimp and red snapper—all served with olive oil pressed by Spiliadis’ sister

A bring-your-own-wine restaurant, L’Atelier combines market produce with comfort food by chefs Patrick Garneau and Benjamin Fortier. The Mile End restaurant is rustic with unfinished wood tables, logs sliced and stacked to resemble a woodpile, and photo portraits of local farmers.