Restaurants in Montreal

Politicos, journalists, academics, and Francophone matrons all gather at this polished and light-filled dining room in the fashionable Outremont neighborhood.

Réservoir's large arched windows open in summer and its second-floor terrace overlooks raised-bed gardens and iron lampposts along cobbled Duluth Avenue. Bare wooden tables and beer vats fill the brasserie-style brewpub.

Set in Montreal’s Little Italy, home to a large Italian population since the 19th-century, Caffe San Simeon has been making espresso, lattes, and cappuccinos since 1996. An Italian flag hangs in the window of the café, which serves drinks in colorful espresso cups and tall glass tumblers.

Bistro Bienville opened in 2006 on a tucked-away, tree-lined residential street that’s a five-minute walk from St. Denis. The restaurant's dining room has white walls and narrow tables, and the exposed kitchen produces an ever-changing menu of a dozen or so dishes.

In 2004, when chef Normand Laprise moved his acclaimed restaurant from its neighborhood haunt up in the Plateau to this airy space downtown, he might have been sending a message with his choice of décor: red carpet all the way.

Located in the city's Mile End district, Jun-I serves fresh fish and inventive Japanese-style dishes from namesake chef Junichi Ikematsu.

Laloux is a Parisian-style bistro in the Plateau neighborhood that offers all of its wines by the glass. The chefs use certified-sustainable seafood and seasonal produce to create menus that change daily.

A secret marinade and wood-charcoal grilling make the Portuguese barbecued chicken Rotisserie Portugalia's signature dish. The chicken has a loyal following and must be ordered an hour in advance.

For eight years, chef Laurent Godbout has been putting a delicious spin on classics (try his pan-seared sea bass with squid-ink risotto, scallops, and a chorizo cream sauce) in this Old Montreal dining room—and he hasn’t missed a beat yet.

Ask for a table on the shaded patio and order a bowl of vegetarian chili and a hearty sandwich.

Traditional French cuisine is the specialty at Chez Gautier, which has been a Montreal staple since the 1970's. The bistro is styled after a Parisian brasserie, with leather benches, dark woodwork, and brass pillars.