Minneapolis/St. Paul

Minneapolis/St. Paul Travel Guide

Few other shops inspire the palate like the Golden Fig. Owner Laurie Crowell, who got her start selling homemade spices and vinegars at the St.

Moto-i, at Lyndale and Lake in Uptown, bills itself the first sake brewpub outside Japan. In addition to draft sake and namazake (unpasteurized specialty sake) the brewpub also serves the usual lineup of liquors, beers, and wine.

A local favorite in Linden Hills, Clancey’s is both a butcher shop and a casual café.

Attracting architecture buffs from across the country, this performance space opened to much fanfare in 2006. Designed by famed French architect Jean Nouvel, it’s a work of art that brings to life three theaters, 11 bars, one restaurant, and one café.

The city’s premier locally owned outdoor store is an addictive spot for adventurers looking for camping, climbing, and paddling gear—or simply a pair of comfortable shoes.

This hands-on museum, beautifully situated on the bluffs of the Mississippi River, is as much a playground for adults as it is for children.

Why It’s Cool: As America’s longest continuous urban public parkway, this circular 50-mile asphalt path includes nine miles along the Mississippi River.

Built in the early 20th century, the columned, Beaux Arts-style Minneapolis Institute of Arts now includes a wing added in 1974 by Japanese architect Kenzo Tange and a 2005 addition by American architect Micheal Graves.

Grumpy’s bar proudly (and rightly) promotes its three pool tables as an attraction, but there is a full "slate" of regular and special events that have patrons clamoring for seats each night as well: recurring karaoke, retro movie nights, comedy sessions and the occasional vaudeville performance,

Both fresh creations and classics from children's literature are brought to life at this family-focused regional theatre.

Jazz enthusiasts of every stripe gather at this nationally renowned venue to hear local talent and touring musicians—everyone from vocalists like Nellie McKay to the ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro.

Named for owner Anthony Andler’s great-grandfather (a tailor and 1917 Russian immigrant), Heimie’s is the sort of men’s clothing store you may have thought extinct.

The first Thursday of every month, between 5 and 9 p.m., is the time to studio hop in Minneapolis’s Northeast neighborhood.