Midtown West

Things to do in Midtown West

With seemingly countless galleries lining its streets, Chelsea is essentially a museum—one displaying everything from experimental art from up-and-comers to more staid works by longtime greats.

Every New Yorker loves a bar with an outdoor patio, and that’s exactly what you’ll find at Bamboo 52. Add to the mix a sushi bar and a well-priced happy hour, which runs from noon until 9 p.m., and you’ve got the makings of the perfect watering hole.

This floating museum is housed in a former U.S. aircraft carrier that served in WWII and Vietnam War. The ship retired in 1982 and, in that same year, the museum was opened.

Housing 50 NYC-themed lanes, Bowlmor is part bowling alley, part nightclub. Beyond knocking down pins over drinks, there’s also the Stadium Grill Sports Bar and Restaurant, run by celeb chef David Burke.

The hullabaloo over MoMA's $600 million makeover in 2005 (and $20 admission fee) has overshadowed how impressive its collection truly is.

Housed in a former Vanderbilt mansion, Bergdorf's is the grande dame of exclusive New York department stores, with nine floors of sheer extravagance from top (the John Barrett salon) to bottom (the almost overwhelming Beauty Level).

The Annex Hell’s Kitchen Flea Market was founded by entrepreneur Alan Boss in 2003.

Manhattan’s Antiques Garage, adored by legions of New York collectors, was slated for demolition but has been saved from the wrecking ball—at least for the foreseeable future. This bi-level concrete parking lot is a survivor from the days when the neighborhood was full of antiques venues.

Owned by chef Thomas Keller, this particular location of the Bouchon Bakery is situated on the third floor of the Time Warner Center across the street from New York’s Central Park.

Within its 2.8 million square feet, the Time Warner Center offers luxury living, entertainment, fine dining, shopping, a hotel, and business space. TWC houses the opulent Mandarin Oriental hotel, as well as hosts live jazz music at Lincoln Center.

Occupying a trapezoidal island diagonally across from Central Park, the 12-story, white-marble building by Edward Durrell Stone stood for close to half a century at 2 Columbus Circle, near the geographic center of Manhattan.

From Mandy Oser, of Le Bernardin, comes this trendy wine and food bar serving mineral-driven wines and a menu of innovative small plates.

Founded by George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein, the New York City Ballet is the largest dance organization in the country with roughly 90 dancers. The famed company makes its home inside the 2,544-seat David H. Koch Theater in Lincoln Center.

It’s kitschy. It’s fun. And it’s probably the only way you’re ever going to get your photograph taken with Morgan Freeman or Justin Bieber.

Originally built in 1923 as a meeting hall for the Ancient Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, this neo-Moorish facility, perhaps best known for its terra cotta tile rooftop, exterior tile work, and three Moller pipe organs, now houses the New York City Center.