Midcoast

Restaurants in Midcoast

Co-owner and James Beard Award–winning chef Melissa Kelly drew on two influences when she opened her Italian restaurant in this renovated 1880s Victorian in 2000.

Overlooking the Damariscotta River where it feeds into the Atlantic, this unpretentious spot—decked out with antique lobster buoys, hurricane lamps, and nautical paraphernalia—is a local favorite for its hit parade of seafood greats and for its busy bar on the water’s edge.

Two miles north of Camden at the Inn at Ocean’s Edge, a leafy path lined with artful walls of stacked wood leads to a ‘70s retro-chic restaurant (accessible only by foot or golf cart).

Cod End consists of a cookhouse, fish market, and dock, all packaged into one locale. The outdoor deck is scattered with picnic tables, which is the preferred place to sit, weather permitting. Indoor seating and a to-go menu are also offered.

Coastal Maine-influenced cuisine is the inspiration at this bistro in Camden, Maine.

The Maine Dining Room restaurant at downtown Freeport’s Harraseeket Inn is a source of local pride; James Beard Award–winning chef Sam Hayward (now at Fore Street) first helped make a culinary name for the Harraseeket in the early ‘90s, and dishes like halibut encrusted in fresh horseradish and f

Maine’s Mid Coast hides some of its best secrets on the “reaches”: long, narrow peninsulas that stretch like fingers into the sea. The sleepy Harpswell peninsula is just a half-hour’s detour off I-295, yet it could be 200 miles away.

Easily identified by its famous giant neon sign, Moody’s endures as the rest stop of choice on Maine’s mid-coast highway.

This seasonal oceanside restaurant, which is affiliated with Spinney's cottages and guesthouse, serves lobsters straight from the tank with drawn butter and bibs.

Hidden far off the beaten path—at the end of a country road in South Harpswell, this family-run marina-side restaurant may appear nondescript, but its fish chowder is a well-guarded local secret.

Differentiating itself from the area's many cafeteria-style seafood shacks, this tapas bar and restaurant specializes in small plates designed for shared noshing over a pitcher of sangria.

Live and cooked lobsters are the draw at this low-key waterfront seafood shack, operated by the nation's oldest fishermen's cooperative.

Part farmstand and part restaurant, Chase’s Daily is owned and operated by Penny Chase and her family. The restaurant, housed inside a refurbished 1888 building, has polished wood floors, a handful of tables, and a counter with red leather stools.