Midcoast

Restaurants in Midcoast

Seven miles from U.S. Route 1 (turnoff opposite Moody’s Diner) is a Teutonic gourmand paradise. Founded in 1918, this friendly family-run operation—where it appears to be Christmas all year round—does a brisk business in delicious edible products from Deutschland.

For owners Bob and June Frost, it’s always time to make the doughnuts—with potato flour.

First, there’s the drive in, a lovely trip along the peninsula south of busy Rockland (where the Maine Lobster Festival is held every August). Down here it’s a scene from a Wyeth canvas: forests of black spruce abutting saltwater farms; the scent of pine mingled with seaweed.

Buddy Poland inherited the lobstering tradition from his New England forebears and manages this shingled lobster shack near a harbor called Round Pond, which empties into Muscongus Sound on Maine’s central coast. They’re open from March through Christmas.

Co-owner and James Beard Award–winning chef Melissa Kelly drew on two influences when she opened her Italian restaurant in this renovated 1880s Victorian in 2000.

Overlooking the Damariscotta River where it feeds into the Atlantic, this unpretentious spot—decked out with antique lobster buoys, hurricane lamps, and nautical paraphernalia—is a local favorite for its hit parade of seafood greats and for its busy bar on the water’s edge.

Two miles north of Camden at the Inn at Ocean’s Edge, a leafy path lined with artful walls of stacked wood leads to a ‘70s retro-chic restaurant (accessible only by foot or golf cart).

Cod End consists of a cookhouse, fish market, and dock, all packaged into one locale. The outdoor deck is scattered with picnic tables, which is the preferred place to sit, weather permitting. Indoor seating and a to-go menu are also offered.

Coastal Maine-influenced cuisine is the inspiration at this bistro in Camden, Maine.

The Maine Dining Room restaurant at downtown Freeport’s Harraseeket Inn is a source of local pride; James Beard Award–winning chef Sam Hayward (now at Fore Street) first helped make a culinary name for the Harraseeket in the early ‘90s, and dishes like halibut encrusted in fresh horseradish and f

Maine’s Mid Coast hides some of its best secrets on the “reaches”: long, narrow peninsulas that stretch like fingers into the sea. The sleepy Harpswell peninsula is just a half-hour’s detour off I-295, yet it could be 200 miles away.

Easily identified by its famous giant neon sign, Moody’s endures as the rest stop of choice on Maine’s mid-coast highway.

This seasonal oceanside restaurant, which is affiliated with Spinney's cottages and guesthouse, serves lobsters straight from the tank with drawn butter and bibs.