Michigan

Michigan Travel Guide

Walk the school’s central campus to admire the mid-1800s architecture.

The store's tables are filled with agate, hematite, and crystalline formations of rosy metal covered in verdigris—a preview of Copper Country’s geological treasures. I also found a stash of hand-painted Munising bowls—local wooden ones that date back to the first half of the 20th century.

Wildly popular in summer, RiverWalk stretches along the water for 2.5 miles of fountains, walkways, and green space starting at the Cobo Hall convention center. Most folks come simply to stroll, fish, or park themselves on a bench and take in the Windsor skyline across the way.

Selling only the best hats crafted in Europe and the U.S. has been the single-minded focus of Henry the Hatter, which has been in Detroit since 1893 and at this location since 1952.

Eclectic lounge. Brothers Jeremy and Daniel Haberman named The Bosco for their middle school playground.

Pick up some homemade fudge at this Mackinac shop - open since 1887.

A sandy stretch with picket fencing, wild beach grass, and surprisingly temperate water.

Taste or pick the fruits—raspberries, cherries, peaches, plums, grapes—at the 150-year-old, family-owned winery.

The region’s premier museum, the Henry Ford is a breathtaking repository for the history of innovation. The sprawling indoor-outdoor collection, located just a few miles from downtown Detroit, would take days to see in its entirety.

This gorgeous park near Thunder Bay, Canada, is the largest island in the world’s largest freshwater body, Lake Superior. Though it ranks as the fifth least-visited park (14,000 annual visitors) in the nation, it has the highest backcountry use.