Restaurants in Michigan

The breakfast and lunch choice of CEO’s, judges, government officials, and other power people is designed to resemble a contemporary yet cozy living room. Bright pastels and plasma TV’s adorn the walls, and there’s even a fireplace in the foyer.

A bakery that makes traditional Finnish ground-meat-and-potato pies, based on the Cornish pasty, and nissua, sweet bread made with cardamom.

You can't miss it: the rooftop vintage neon sign brightly spells out REALLY GOOD AMERICAN FOOD and the menu reads like a national registry; Mississippi catfish, New Mexico green chiles, Apalachicola oysters, Minnesota wild rice.

American brasserie

New Three Star BarBQ is the place to go for dry-rubbed ribs and a cold brew in Hamtramck. Located on Joseph Campau Street, this modest, three-generation diner has tile flooring and Tiffany-style lamps, and is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Vicentes feels a bit like an old-fashioned supper club, with blond wood chairs, tables covered in a striking shade of burgundy, and a dance floor that comes alive with salsa music after 10 p.m. on weekends.

At this German bistro waitresses in dirndls serve schnitzels and grilled Lake Superior trout and whitefish; a 1,720-pound specimen of native copper is planted in the ground, ushering diners toward the lake-view restaurant’s copper-clad doors.

On the upper floor of 220 & Edison you'll find a relaxed local crowd that comes for dishes like the sautéed lake perch piccata. Downstairs, it's about socializing over well-crafted mixed drinks or wine.

With home cooking and affordable prices, the restaurant offers a pleasantly diverse menu that bounces from Mexico to Greece and Italy.

This restaurant offers the town’s only true waterfront dining; enjoy regional cuisine and a table near the fireplace or window.

Drive or boat up to this restaurant in the Marina District of the Detroit River. The two-story building with many windows has 36 boat wells available for restaurant guests.

Detroit’s late-19th-century heyday is on display in this pink granite, 52-room mansion, originally built in 1894 for lumber baron David Whitney.