Michigan

Things to do in Michigan

For travelers looking for things to do in Michigan, the state offers a wide array of water-activities. Sailing, fishing and motor boating are extremely popular both on the inland lakes and the Great Lakes. Nature-lovers can get their fill canoeing through the rivers that wind through Michigan’s lush, verdant forests, or hiking through one of the trails that snake through the state’s interior.

Hard-core urbanites wondering what to do in Michigan won’t be disappointed. Detroit contains numerous art galleries, restaurants, concert venues, four major casinos and numerous bars and breweries. The state is also well regarded for its craft brew scene, so beer-lovers searching for things to do in Michigan won’t have to look far. Additionally, sports-fans won’t be at a loss for what to do in Michigan – the city of Detroit hosts four major professional sporting teams: The Lions (football), the Red Wings (hockey), the Tigers (baseball) and the Pistons (basketball).

Walk the school’s central campus to admire the mid-1800s architecture.

A treasure hidden in plain sight, this 40-story architectural gem is a quirky Art Deco-style orangey brick-terra-cotta-limestone skyscraper.

Known for its award-winning wines and spirits, Black Star Farms has a luxurious B&B, farmers’ market, creamery, and stables. Try its Arcturos Late Harvest Riesling at any of the three tasting rooms in Suttons Bay, Traverse City, and on the Old Mission Peninsula.

Taste the influences of the owners’ Australian and German wine heritages in unique varietal blends.

Packed with sports fans year-round and party types on hot summer nights, this hulking, three-floor bar takes its moniker from the nickname given to Detroit during the Red Wings recent glory days. It’s located across the street from Comerica Park, home of the Tigers.

Sail Grand Traverse Bay on the schooner Manitou, one of the Great Lakes’ largest sailing vessels.

Stand in the studio where countless hits for the famous Motown label were recorded. This modest brick home—bought in 1959 by Berry Gordy Jr. and christened Hitsville USA—was transformed into a museum in 1985 by Gordy’s sister Esther.

Choose from handmade truffles—from dark chocolate to vanilla rose.

The sort of store bibliophiles dream about is housed in an old glove factory in the shadow of historic Corktown. Row after row of books—more than a million in total—fill four hardwood-floor levels permeated with that wonderful, slightly musty smell of old paper.

The local hangout is the spot for drinks, karaoke, and live music.

After a $158 million renovation, Detroit’s well-respected institute reopened with updated infrastructure and galleries in late 2007.