Miami

Restaurants in Miami

Miami restaurants have gained worldwide acclaim for offering unique New World cuisine, also known as “Nuevo Latino” or “Floribbean,” a play on the combination of Caribbean and American culinary styles. Restaurants in Miami tend to specialize in Cuban and South American dishes, but as an international destination Miami offers plenty of award-winning international and fusion restaurants that will satisfy cravings for Chinese, Japanese, French, Middle Eastern and Italian cuisine, too.

Miami is also known for the number of nightclubs that double as restaurants, especially in South Beach. Cibo Wine Bar, located in Coral Gables, serves up authentic, rustic Italian, and also doubles as a nightlife hotspot. The stone and glass interior, complete with rustic wood finishes, makes it a sport that feels both casual and contemporary. Award-winning The Forge, open since 1969, serves a farm-to-table menu in a sumptuously decorated space with walls of hand-carved blonde wood and antique smoked mirrors. The menu boasts specialties based on Miami’s bounteous seafood, such as sea scallop ceviche, Maine lobster risotto and Florida stone crab claws, as well as fusion twists on seafood classics like miso-marinated Chilean sea bass and organic farm-raised salmon served with hazelnuts and smoked trout caviar.

Miamians love the views of pricey speedboats and overloaded cargo ships from the open-air tables set along the Miami River at this downtown joint, but the real star is the seafood. It comes fried, blackened, or grilled to perfection and is served with sweet or green plantains.

Since 1999, chef Michael D’Andrea has showcased his family’s 75-year-old recipes at this Staten Island-style Italian eatery in South Beach.

A flashy, high-end Chinese restaurant housed inside the equally flashy W South Beach Hotel, Mr. Chow is owned by famed restauranteur Michael Chow, who also owns restaurants in New York and London.

Located on 27th Avenue in Little Havana, Islas Canarias has been serving authentic Cuban food to Miami’s families for 30 years. Dishes like vaca frita, crema de malanga, and ensalada de aguacate are executed with faithfulness to Cuban culinary tradition.

Established in 1971, this casual café began as a gathering place for Cuban exiles living in Little Havana. Over the decades, it has continued to serve as a social and political center for the community while also offering some of the most authentic Cuban cuisine in Miami.

This upscale fusion restaurant reflects the cultural heritage of chef and owner Jean-Paul Desmaison, who was born in Peru and trained in Europe.

YUCA, which stands for Young Upscale Cuban-American, caters to just that crowd, and power brokers and the political class love to network at this Miami Beach destination.

An 8th Street strip mall serves as an unglamorous host to this hole-in-the-wall Vietnamese