Miami Beach

Restaurants in Miami Beach

The best restaurants in Miami Beach offer a myriad of cuisines amid innovative settings—from classic Cubano sandwiches in Little Havana to California-Asian fusion in South Beach and classic French. (Another good reason to go dancing here: it burns calories.) Hakkasan, located in the Fontainebleau, is an award-winning Miami Beach restaurant serves up modern Cantonese cuisine and exotic cocktails. Rich turquoise fabrics and teak carved walls create an intimate setting. Come on weekends for the fabulous dim sum.

Prime 112 is a Miami Beach restaurant on Ocean Drive is a favorite among celebrities and the international crowd, thanks in part to its succulent steak and lobster dishes, and an incredible truffle macaroni and cheese. It’s a great place to celebrate—as long as you love the noisy energy. Located in The Sanctuary Hotel, OLA specializes in Latin American, Caribbean and Spanish flavors, created by award-winning chef Horace Rivadero. OLA is certainly one of the more innovative Miami Beach restaurants. La Gloutonnerie has an upscale French dining experience offering the classics amid French country décor—but since this is still Miami Beach, there’s good patio dining, too. Always keep up to date on new openings, you might find yourself in one of the next the best restaurants in Miami Beach.

A haven for clubgoers seeking an affordable, fast dining option to satisfy their late night cravings, T-Mex has earned a following with its reliable Mexican fare.

Located inside a 1925 Mediterranean-style beach home, which is also a boutique hotel, Casa Tua serves Italian cuisine.

A flashy, high-end Chinese restaurant housed inside the equally flashy W South Beach Hotel, Mr. Chow is owned by famed restauranteur Michael Chow, who also owns restaurants in New York and London.

Vix

The menu changes to reflect the day's catch, from cobia to scallops.

A steakhouse located inside the Browns Hotel, Prime One Twelve specializes in large portions of steaks and chops. The dining room has exposed brick columns and dark-wood tables and floors.

Originally founded in the Art Deco District, the Frieze is named after the famous architectural element used in many buildings there. The shop is owned by the Warren family, who supervises the production of the company’s ice cream and sorbet flavors, made fresh daily.

An outpost of New York’s Sushi Samba, this South Beach restaurant employs a multicultural approach to sushi, using Japanese, Peruvian, and Brazilian flavors to create unique dishes. The lively space has a club-like atmosphere that frequently attracts celebrities.

Located on the ground level of the Penguin Hotel, the Front Porch Café has been serving diner-style breakfasts and lunches since the 1970's. The dining room is dotted with wooden tables and chairs, and meals are served on retro-looking plates.