Mexico

Restaurants in Mexico

Corazón de Tierra serves deliciously complex dishes such as black cod in onion embers with onion-verbena purée.

At Javier Plascencia’s alfresco Finca Altozano, the focus is on impeccably grilled meats and seafood.

Drop by this homey restaurant for slow-roasted pork and house-made corn tortilla quesadillas.

A high-ceilinged, blue-and-white dining room is the setting for long, loud, convivial lunches, especially on weekends. Fashionable locals come here to see and be seen, but the food is better than you’d expect.

Of the four popular Ávila Spanish-food restaurants in Mexico City, two are at the airport. Interiors suggest dining rooms in Spain’s medieval city of Ávila. Service is friendly, expert, and more formal (tablecloths and crystal) than one might expect.

Run by acclaimed chef-owner Enrique Olvera, Pujol is often lauded as the city's best Mexican nouvelle restaurant.

Meaning “the monkey cave,” La Cueva del Chango is an immersive dining experience. The restaurant is designed to resemble a cave, complete with small waterways, lush tropical foliage, and a pair of resident spider monkeys.

Named for the nearby Mayan pyramid Kinich-Kakmó, this restaurant specializes in traditional Yucatecan cuisine. The dining room is open and airy, with large windows and tall archways, but the most popular seating is outside on the thatched-roof patio.

Chef John Gray, who elevated the Ritz-Carlton’s Club Grill to iconic status in the ’90s with his classical approach to Mexican ingredients, recently, and inevitably, opened a restaurant in the Hotel Zone—essentially a glass-enclosed pier over Nichupté Lagoon.

This, intimate, open-walled Italian restaurant forgoes menus and sticks with a consistent rotation of a handful of pastas made in-house and two to three dishes built around fish caught that day. Each meal begins with an antipasto platter that includes bruschetta, focaccia, and cauliflower.

This massive Argentinean steak house, located inside a nondescript shopping mall, has an ardent following, and for good reason—its meat dishes, many of which are grilled over charcoal and wood fires to succulent perfection.

Keep it simple: grilled trout and a margarita.