Hotels in Mexico

Families love this resort, which keeps the focus on fun, poolside vibes: the infinity-edge main pool has a swim-up bar and hosts fashion shows, and kids can hit the waterslide or splash around in their own, shallow space.

Tucked squarely between Mexico’s craggy cliffs and the turquoise sea, on a secluded Peninsua, this resort offers one of the most breathtaking views of the newly-revitalized Cabo San Lucas. Whether you opt for a studio or an expansive penthouse, all guests have stunning ocean views.

Mexico’s Riviera Maya is known for its sprawling resorts, but the new, 27-room Acanto Boutique Hotel proves that low-key simplicity also has a place on the Yucatan peninsula.

In Ensenada, along the Pacific coast, Cabañas Cuatro Cuatros has stylish canvas tents with open-air showers and terraces overlooking vineyards and olive groves.

Forget everything you thought you knew about Cancún all-inclusives: this glam adults-only gem blows all your preconceptions out of the water. For a start, the food is top-notch.

After a nearly $100-million facilities upgrade in 2012, Cancún’s beachfront Moon Palace resort is putting a little luxury back into the all-inclusive model.

Food is a focus at this Spanish-colonial spa spread over 3,000 acres in the foothills of Mount Kuchumaa, where a new open kitchen (the place for cooking classes and more) is set on the property’s organic farm.

The sunrise and sea inspired this boutique hotel unique yellow and blue color scheme, located in on the fringe of Playa's Centro district. Whereas some local properties play up Playa del Carmen’s Mayan roots, Mosquito Blue opted for luxury, regardless of provenance.

The 156-room resort is an oasis of calm away from the crowds of central Cancún. The minimalist design sets it apart from other area hotels: gauzy curtains line the lobby, and whitewashed rooms are filled with fire engine–red chairs.

For those who fear Cancún is all spring break debauchery, the Royal may be what you're looking for. With its adults-only policy, this 288-room quasi-Palladian all-inclusive has a distinctly grown-up sensibility.

For its first city resort in Mexico, Rosewood looked to San Miguel's history to create a colonial-era hacienda where every corner reveals local artisans' work: cantera stone in patios and colonnades; curled bedposts and ornate tin mirror frames in 67 guest rooms.