Mexico City

Mexico City Travel Guide

On the campus of the National Autonomous University of Mexico this museum showcases contemporary international and Mexican artists such as Gabriel Orozco in a soaring, light-filled building unveiled in 2008.

Connecting the airport’s two terminals, the Aerotrén, which runs on elevated tracks, is the first such train in Latin America. It is speedy and efficient and provides an overview of airport activity—lively entertainment for restless kids. The Aerotrén operates from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m.

A perfect place for last-minute souvenirs, El Gran Pastor specializes in products from Monterrey, from traditional glorias, dulce de leche candies, rollos de nogate (guayaba and nut rolls), and caramel-filled marzipan to the famous regional specialty, machaca (dried bee

Get a bird's-eye view of Valle's pine forests and mountains with a paragliding lesson from FlyMexico. You'll leap off the 7,300-foot-high Peñón de Temascaltepec.

For those with an early-morning layover, Sala 21 snack bar and lounge is a perfect spot to read the morning paper while having a breakfast of pancakes, bacon, and Viennese coffee.  The lounge also offers travelers an excellent menu of appetizers and cocktails, featuring Tequila Milagro, in a sett

One of Mexico’s leading intellectual publishers, Fondo de Cultura Económica, has two shops at the airport (each with its own name) with a wide selection of books by Spanish-language and international writers. Both are open daily from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Don't miss Cuban music on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at Casa Lamm, a cultural institution in a 1913 mansion.

For vintage Luis Barragán chairs and other Modernist Mexican furniture.

An early-20th-century building turned experimental art and performance hall that was recently redesigned by star architect Enrique Norten.

Carlos Place is a lively hotel bar that offers views of the airport runways. It has a full bar and a superb selection of Mexican beer and tequilas, plus a fun menu of margaritas and martinis made with tamarind, coconut, or chocolate.

This boutique features locally crafted jewelry made with silver mined from the historic city of Taxco, the world’s silver capital.  Whether you are looking for modern designs or traditional Mexican folk images, you’ll find it here.

Take a tour on a J-24 racing sailboat with expert guide Tito "El Chino" Benítez. Race other crafts around the lake or lazily explore the area, stopping for a dip under one of three waterfalls.

Three dozen kinds of dried chiles and mole pastes? Pungent Oaxacan cheese, stacks of nopals, and the mingled scents of guavas and epazote? It's all here at the gigantic Merced, which spans several city blocks and has more than 3,000 vendors from across Mexico.