Mexico City

Restaurants in Mexico City

Tortilla soup gets the VIP treatment at the hyper-authentic Azul y Oro café. Flavored with guajillo-chile paste and tangy crema and strips of pasilla chile, the sopa bears no resemblance to the watery stuff at your local enchilada joint.

Although Ivoire is a French restaurant, it is one of the trendiest eateries in the Polanco district. Perhaps this is because the location is incomparable with the serene Parque del Reloj directly across the street. The interior has a peaceful vibe thanks to a Provençal design.

La Mascota is a traditional cantina known for having some of the best botanas (free tapas with a three-drink minimum) in the city’s historic center. The restaurant is located under a small green awning at the bottom of a slightly dilapidated Colonial building.

Keep it simple: grilled trout and a margarita.

If you're in the mood for good old-fashioned frijoles or pork-topped tacos al pastor, this place serves some of the best Mexican comfort food around.

With the vibrant colors, craft décor, and rustic dining chairs with woven rush seats here, you may feel as if you have stumbled into a colonial town of Mexico, albeit with a fun-house twist.

Tourists frequent Café de Tacuba not only for the food and pastries, but also for the art that lines the walls. Situated in the historic city center, the café sits inside what was once an 18th-century convent.

ZHEN’s base camp may be in Shanghai, but this Mexico City outpost inside the Polanco district’s Presidente InterContinental Hotel is as close to gourmet Chinese cuisine as visitors can get.

Order delicious huaraches (griddled masa cakes) with toppings such as chorizo and carne asada.

Fonda el Refugio serves regional Mexican cuisine for lunch and dinner. Located on a tree-lined street, the bright blue, two-story building has a Spanish-style, white stucco entrance and red tile overhang.

The minimalist interior sets the stage for a Basque-inspired menu that contrasts classic dishes—sea bass in clam sauce—with such experimental interpretations as boneless short rib de la olla, slowly cooked with raisins, piñon, and cinnamon.

The mediterranean-inspired restaurant's wood-burning oven delivers crispy, thin-crust pizza.

These are outposts of the popular Mexican natural food restaurant chain that originated in Acapulco and is noted for its use of the freshest ingredients and avoidance of preservatives and artificial flavoring.