Mexico City

Restaurants in Mexico City

From traditional Mexican cuisine to high-end international fare, Mexico City restaurants offer virtually any kind of food you could think of. The city has a reputation for offering fantastic street snacks, and with good reason–tacos, sopes, tortas and giant fruit cups can be found all over town at very low prices. But if you’re looking for the best restaurants in Mexico City, here are a few fail-proof spots.

Enrique Olvera, one of Mexico’s most highly-regarded chefs, has made Pujol a dining destination for locals and tourists alike, thanks to his perfect balance between respect for traditional Mexican ingredients and techniques and fearless creativity. Pujol has been featured in San Pellegrino’s World’s 50 Best Restaurants list since 2010. Located in Mexico’s hip Roma neighborhood, Maximo Bistrot serves a seasonal menu that changes daily inside a welcoming space outfitted with furniture, dishware and napkins made by local artisans. Fresh ingredients and market availability inform the sophisticated yet approachable menu. To experience an old-school Mexico City meal, head to one of El Cardenal’s four locations (the Downtown outpost, set inside a historic building, is particularly charming). The restaurant is especially popular for its hearty breakfasts, which feature specialties like Michoacán-style enchiladas, scrambled eggs in clay pots, and house-made pastries paired with steaming mugs of hot chocolate.

A high-ceilinged, blue-and-white dining room is the setting for long, loud, convivial lunches, especially on weekends. Fashionable locals come here to see and be seen, but the food is better than you’d expect.

Tortilla soup gets the VIP treatment at the hyper-authentic Azul y Oro café. Flavored with guajillo-chile paste and tangy crema and strips of pasilla chile, the sopa bears no resemblance to the watery stuff at your local enchilada joint.

Keep it simple: grilled trout and a margarita.

Tourists frequent Café de Tacuba not only for the food and pastries, but also for the art that lines the walls. Situated in the historic city center, the café sits inside what was once an 18th-century convent.

Order delicious huaraches (griddled masa cakes) with toppings such as chorizo and carne asada.

The mediterranean-inspired restaurant's wood-burning oven delivers crispy, thin-crust pizza.

wildly popular for its sopa de migas, a restorative bread soup.

La Hacienda de los Morales is an iconic Polanco district restaurant, bar, and special events destination. The hacienda (estate) was established in 1526 as a silkworm factory and today exudes Spanish colonial architecture, with its huge arches and cracked plaster walls.

Náos is a highly modern restaurant housed at the base of a glass skyscraper in Polanco’s chic Palmas neighborhood. Mexico City’s trendy set can be seen eating from the outside as the restaurant’s floor-to-ceiling windows make peeping a possibility.

The glitterati head for local celebrity chef Elena Reygadas's Italian fare (octopus carpaccio; asparagus risotto), served in a restored Belle Époque mansion.

Although Ivoire is a French restaurant, it is one of the trendiest eateries in the Polanco district. Perhaps this is because the location is incomparable with the serene Parque del Reloj directly across the street. The interior has a peaceful vibe thanks to a Provençal design.

If you're in the mood for good old-fashioned frijoles or pork-topped tacos al pastor, this place serves some of the best Mexican comfort food around.

ZHEN’s base camp may be in Shanghai, but this Mexico City outpost inside the Polanco district’s Presidente InterContinental Hotel is as close to gourmet Chinese cuisine as visitors can get.