Mexico City

Restaurants in Mexico City

From traditional Mexican cuisine to high-end international fare, Mexico City restaurants offer virtually any kind of food you could think of. The city has a reputation for offering fantastic street snacks, and with good reason–tacos, sopes, tortas and giant fruit cups can be found all over town at very low prices. But if you’re looking for the best restaurants in Mexico City, here are a few fail-proof spots.

Enrique Olvera, one of Mexico’s most highly-regarded chefs, has made Pujol a dining destination for locals and tourists alike, thanks to his perfect balance between respect for traditional Mexican ingredients and techniques and fearless creativity. Pujol has been featured in San Pellegrino’s World’s 50 Best Restaurants list since 2010. Located in Mexico’s hip Roma neighborhood, Maximo Bistrot serves a seasonal menu that changes daily inside a welcoming space outfitted with furniture, dishware and napkins made by local artisans. Fresh ingredients and market availability inform the sophisticated yet approachable menu. To experience an old-school Mexico City meal, head to one of El Cardenal’s four locations (the Downtown outpost, set inside a historic building, is particularly charming). The restaurant is especially popular for its hearty breakfasts, which feature specialties like Michoacán-style enchiladas, scrambled eggs in clay pots, and house-made pastries paired with steaming mugs of hot chocolate.

Tourists frequent Café de Tacuba not only for the food and pastries, but also for the art that lines the walls. Situated in the historic city center, the café sits inside what was once an 18th-century convent.

ZHEN’s base camp may be in Shanghai, but this Mexico City outpost inside the Polanco district’s Presidente InterContinental Hotel is as close to gourmet Chinese cuisine as visitors can get.

Order delicious huaraches (griddled masa cakes) with toppings such as chorizo and carne asada.

Fonda el Refugio serves regional Mexican cuisine for lunch and dinner. Located on a tree-lined street, the bright blue, two-story building has a Spanish-style, white stucco entrance and red tile overhang.

The minimalist interior sets the stage for a Basque-inspired menu that contrasts classic dishes—sea bass in clam sauce—with such experimental interpretations as boneless short rib de la olla, slowly cooked with raisins, piñon, and cinnamon.

The mediterranean-inspired restaurant's wood-burning oven delivers crispy, thin-crust pizza.

These are outposts of the popular Mexican natural food restaurant chain that originated in Acapulco and is noted for its use of the freshest ingredients and avoidance of preservatives and artificial flavoring.

Run by acclaimed chef-owner Enrique Olvera, Pujol is often lauded as the city's best Mexican nouvelle restaurant.

wildly popular for its sopa de migas, a restorative bread soup.

A bistro in the Mexico City airport may come as a surprise, but this casual spot offers contemporary Mexican dishes—meatballs in chipotle sauce, red snapper with cumin—in addition to French classics and Mediterranean fare for sit-down meals or quick lunches.

La Bipolar is one of the city’s most star-studded cantinas, as A-list Mexican actor Diego Luna co-owns this funky fabulous restaurant and bar. Situated in an aging building on a tree-lined Coyoacán boulevard, “La B” doesn’t look like a hot hangout for Mexico’s brightest stars.

La Hacienda de los Morales is an iconic Polanco district restaurant, bar, and special events destination. The hacienda (estate) was established in 1526 as a silkworm factory and today exudes Spanish colonial architecture, with its huge arches and cracked plaster walls.

For more than 50 years, La Mansión, which has more than a dozen locations in the nation’s capital, has satisfied Mexico City’s taste for beef on a grand scale.

Náos is a highly modern restaurant housed at the base of a glass skyscraper in Polanco’s chic Palmas neighborhood. Mexico City’s trendy set can be seen eating from the outside as the restaurant’s floor-to-ceiling windows make peeping a possibility.