Mexico City

Restaurants in Mexico City

wildly popular for its sopa de migas, a restorative bread soup.

A bistro in the Mexico City airport may come as a surprise, but this casual spot offers contemporary Mexican dishes—meatballs in chipotle sauce, red snapper with cumin—in addition to French classics and Mediterranean fare for sit-down meals or quick lunches.

La Bipolar is one of the city’s most star-studded cantinas, as A-list Mexican actor Diego Luna co-owns this funky fabulous restaurant and bar. Situated in an aging building on a tree-lined Coyoacán boulevard, “La B” doesn’t look like a hot hangout for Mexico’s brightest stars.

La Hacienda de los Morales is an iconic Polanco district restaurant, bar, and special events destination. The hacienda (estate) was established in 1526 as a silkworm factory and today exudes Spanish colonial architecture, with its huge arches and cracked plaster walls.

For more than 50 years, La Mansión, which has more than a dozen locations in the nation’s capital, has satisfied Mexico City’s taste for beef on a grand scale.

Náos is a highly modern restaurant housed at the base of a glass skyscraper in Polanco’s chic Palmas neighborhood. Mexico City’s trendy set can be seen eating from the outside as the restaurant’s floor-to-ceiling windows make peeping a possibility.

Oscar Wilde 9 may be one of the most flavorful restaurants in Mexico City. Tucked between a salon and a dry cleaner along charming Oscar Wilde Street in the Polanco colonia (neighborhood), the restaurant is barely noticeable with its small black awning and picture window.

The glitterati head for local celebrity chef Elena Reygadas's Italian fare (octopus carpaccio; asparagus risotto), served in a restored Belle Époque mansion.

Of the four popular Ávila Spanish-food restaurants in Mexico City, two are at the airport. Interiors suggest dining rooms in Spain’s medieval city of Ávila. Service is friendly, expert, and more formal (tablecloths and crystal) than one might expect.

A high-ceilinged, blue-and-white dining room is the setting for long, loud, convivial lunches, especially on weekends. Fashionable locals come here to see and be seen, but the food is better than you’d expect.

Tortilla soup gets the VIP treatment at the hyper-authentic Azul y Oro café. Flavored with guajillo-chile paste and tangy crema and strips of pasilla chile, the sopa bears no resemblance to the watery stuff at your local enchilada joint.

Although Ivoire is a French restaurant, it is one of the trendiest eateries in the Polanco district. Perhaps this is because the location is incomparable with the serene Parque del Reloj directly across the street. The interior has a peaceful vibe thanks to a Provençal design.

La Mascota is a traditional cantina known for having some of the best botanas (free tapas with a three-drink minimum) in the city’s historic center. The restaurant is located under a small green awning at the bottom of a slightly dilapidated Colonial building.

Keep it simple: grilled trout and a margarita.