Massachusetts

Things to do in Massachusetts

There are plenty of things to do in Massachusetts, but most activities and attractions will depend on the season you choose to visit. Warm, sunny days are best spent along the coast as the Cape Cod area is known for its miles of sandy beaches. Or skip the beach and hop on a ferry to nearby Martha’s Vineyard or Nantucket Island to explore historic seaports and lighthouses by bike. If you’d like to work off last evening’s sumptuous dinner, you can rent all types of water sports equipment in most coastal towns. If you’re a history buff, chances are you’ll know what to do in Massachusetts —head for Boston, of course! Known as “The Cradle of Liberty,” Boston has dozens of historical sites and tours.

If you can’t decide what to do first, just jump on a tour trolley and get your bearings while someone else does the driving. You can hop on and off at numerous sites around the city as often as you please. Should the weather be disagreeable, there are still many things to do in Boston like take in a show in the lively theater district or visit the world renowned Boston Symphony Orchestra. If you’re wondering what to do in Massachusetts during the colder months, the answer can be found in the Berkshires. In autumn, nature puts on a magnificent display of colorful foliage, and in colder months, the mountains come alive to accommodate winter sports enthusiasts, making Massachusetts a great vacation destination for all seasons.

This complex has it all—over 50 dealers under a single roof selling everything from antique high chairs to Oriental rugs.

This 37-member consortium of Berkshire-area dealers from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York is a go-to source for fine American furniture, Delft earthenware, French finials.

Beautiful hand-loomed blankets, throws, rugs, and upholstery fabrics—many of them made on-site in the second-floor weaving studio—have been the hallmark of this weaving collective-cum-shop since 1968.

Brace Yourself: There are three versions of the Bizarro coaster in the U.S.: one at Darien Lake in New York State, one at Six Flags American in Maryland, and one here. But this is the one that wins the awards every year as the best roller coaster in the U.S.

This eclectic museum occupies a meticulous replica of a Venetian palazzo and showcases an unparalleled collection of old masters, Gothic tapestries, and Renaissance furniture.

An ultra-green picking experience can be had at this intimate orchard in western Massachusetts that has offered PYO only since 2008. Orchardists Jen Williams and Steve Gougeon eschew even the use of broad-spectrum pesticides approved for organic orchards.

A folk and country music and dance camp primarily for adults, Pinewoods got its start in 1919 as the first National Girl Scout Leadership Training School. By 1935, the Girl Scouts had moved elsewhere and the camp changed its focus to music and dance.

The colorful display outside the beachfront shop makes for a popular photo spot in P-town.

The rambling former residence of the famous illustrator has been turned into a museum. The first floor has an ample display of his pen-and-ink drawings, along with personal photographs and mementos.

Walk the mile-long Beech Forest Trail, which winds through fragile sand dunes.

Jobi Pottery, in Truro, has been making its retro pieces, decorated with small black fish, since 1953.

This open-air stand on the side of the highway is your stop for beach plum jelly, rosehip jam, and cranberry marmalade.

Bonatt’s Bakery & Restaurant, in Harwichport, is nothing to look at—but its sugarcoated Meltaway rolls are dreamy.

This boutique has monochromatic clothes by up-and-coming designers like Thread Social and Nili Lotan.