Massachusetts

Massachusetts Travel Guide

This 37-member consortium of Berkshire-area dealers from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York is a go-to source for fine American furniture, Delft earthenware, French finials.

This complex has it all—over 50 dealers under a single roof selling everything from antique high chairs to Oriental rugs.

This Qing Dynasty merchant’s house from around 1800 was moved, stone by board, from China and re-erected.

Plimoth Plantation is a living museum that teaches visitors about Plymouth’s early English colonists and the indigenous Wampanoag people. The 17th-century English Village is a re-creation of the settlement built by the pilgrims after their arrival on The Mayflower in 1620.

Things have changed a bit since the original stand opened north of Boston in 1952, but customers are still served old-fashioned frappes (Yankee for milk shake), and ice cream sodas come with a lump of ice cream topping the rim of the glass.

Rock Harbor in Orleans has planted trees in the surf to mark the channel for boats, and they make for a striking silhouette against the colorful sky.

The emphasis here, also home to the Cape Cod Center for the Arts, is on Broadway musicals. Bette Davis famously began her career here, as an usher.

Though it’s been around since 1904 and has its flagship store elsewhere (specifically, on New York City’s Park Avenue), this opulent jewelry shop’s Nantucket location bears mentioning for two reasons.

Rent a bike at Gale Force Bike Rentals in Provincetown, pick up a map, and ride five miles along scenic High Head Road to the Cape Cod Highland Lighthouse, the oldest lighthouse on the Cape.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this waterway—which separates South Boston from downtown—was surrounded by scores of busy warehouses, where leather goods were manufactured, wool was stored, and beer was bottled.

The campus museum boasts 10 galleries dedicated to Asian, Renaissance, and contemporary art.

The museum is a village in miniature spread over 13 acres, with 26 buildings dedicated to art, music, dance, film, and theater. The institution can showcase exhibits of immense proportions and is the largest center for contemporary visual and performing arts in the country.

Anyone fascinated by Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (or, more recently, Nathan Philbrick’s National Book Award-winning In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex) will find plenty to enjoy in this small downtown museum.

Whether you want furniture painted by Peter Hunt or vintage firearms, this comprehensive shop has it all.

A phonetic translation of the French phrase “coup de coeur,” which loosely means “a strike to the heart,” Koo de Kir is a modern home furnishings and accessories boutique in the Beacon Hill neighborhood.