Massachusetts

Massachusetts Travel Guide

This complex has it all—over 50 dealers under a single roof selling everything from antique high chairs to Oriental rugs.

This 37-member consortium of Berkshire-area dealers from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York is a go-to source for fine American furniture, Delft earthenware, French finials.

The 300-year-old farm has 50 varietals, from classic Red Delicious to sweet-yet-tart Winter Banana.

Owners Beth Ann Hoyos and Lorrinda Cerrutti have created a juxtaposition of old and new at The Velvet Fly. The North End boutique offers a selection of one-of-kind clothing, jewelry, handbags, accessories, and gifts not found anywhere else.

Drop by this downtown Nantucket shop to see why it calls itself “The French General Store.” Since 1996, L'Ile de France has been importing directly from its eponymous country.

Rock anthem lyrics scrawled across the ceiling and cocktail tables decorated with the familiar faces of celebrity rockers set the stage at this music-themed club.

This downtown newsstand has been a popular spot in Nantucket for many years. Although mainly a place to pick up a newspaper (mailboxes inside were once used to reserve papers for locals), the store also sells sundries, magazines, and gifts.

A raised platform wends its way through an amazing light-dappled swamp. The result is magical.

A great place to visit on a rainy day, the aquarium is the oldest research aquarium in the country.

Lying between the Chatham mainland and Tern Island, Aunt Lydia’s Cove and its sandbars and island beaches can be viewed from Shore Road and the Chatham Fish Pier.

Founded in 1630 as the colonial village of Newtowne, Cambridge's thronged central square today is filled with chain stores and roving students—not exactly the cauldron of American intellectual life that it was in the 19th and 20th centuries.

If Ralph Lauren had married Lilly Pulitzer, their sons would shop here. Ties in nautical patterns, woven belts, madras shorts, and lobster-print totes are equal parts preppy and cheeky.

Three times a year, the 18th-century town of Brimfield is overwhelmed by a series of antiques shows set up in humongous open fields for a six-day stretch. Virtually anything you collect, no matter how obscure, will likely turn up among the merchandise at the 5,000-odd tents.

The whimsical shop carries affordable housewares and furniture like an Offi birch coffee table for $180.