Massachusetts

Things to do in Massachusetts

There are plenty of things to do in Massachusetts, but most activities and attractions will depend on the season you choose to visit. Warm, sunny days are best spent along the coast as the Cape Cod area is known for its miles of sandy beaches. Or skip the beach and hop on a ferry to nearby Martha’s Vineyard or Nantucket Island to explore historic seaports and lighthouses by bike. If you’d like to work off last evening’s sumptuous dinner, you can rent all types of water sports equipment in most coastal towns. If you’re a history buff, chances are you’ll know what to do in Massachusetts —head for Boston, of course! Known as “The Cradle of Liberty,” Boston has dozens of historical sites and tours.

If you can’t decide what to do first, just jump on a tour trolley and get your bearings while someone else does the driving. You can hop on and off at numerous sites around the city as often as you please. Should the weather be disagreeable, there are still many things to do in Boston like take in a show in the lively theater district or visit the world renowned Boston Symphony Orchestra. If you’re wondering what to do in Massachusetts during the colder months, the answer can be found in the Berkshires. In autumn, nature puts on a magnificent display of colorful foliage, and in colder months, the mountains come alive to accommodate winter sports enthusiasts, making Massachusetts a great vacation destination for all seasons.

This complex has it all—over 50 dealers under a single roof selling everything from antique high chairs to Oriental rugs.

This 37-member consortium of Berkshire-area dealers from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York is a go-to source for fine American furniture, Delft earthenware, French finials.

Spend a day on the 60-plus rides. Check the website for frequent discounts.

Once a landfill, Spectacle Island is now a beautiful 105-acre outdoor destination where visitors can enjoy everything from hiking to swimming. Just a 15-minute ferry ride from Boston, the island is one of 34 that fall under the auspices of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area.

Craigville Beach, the place to see and be seen in Hyannis, is sometimes called Muscle Beach for its concentration of buff beachgoers.

Art’s Dune Tours, in Provincetown, take travelers off road through the lunar landscape of the dunes outside town; in the distance you can see the shacks that have been inhabited over the years by Tennessee Williams, Jackson Pollock, and other legends, and are still rented to artists.

Peter O’Donovan relocated from Ireland to open Chatham’s Nantucket Wild Gourmet & Smokehouse, where he cures heavenly organic salmon on-site.

Established in 1947, Wally Walcott's live-jazz bar hosts up-and-coming performers (many of them students at the nearby Berklee College of Music and New England Conservatory) 365 nights a year.

One of the hidden gems of Cape Cod is Falmouth’s Spohr Gardens, laid out in the 1950’s by Margaret and Charles D. Spohr and now owned by a charitable trust. An ideal place for quiet contemplation, the six acres of daffodils, rhododendrons, and daylilies edge placid Oyster Pond.

This storefront on Charles Street in historic Beacon Hill has become a favorite with locals for unique jewelry, gifts, and home accessories. Hand-picked by owner Paul Niski, Good’s merchandise spans both the globe and history.

This cluster of buildings on the way to Cisco Beach is home base to Nantucket’s local spirits producers.

Judy and Joy Catuogno, the twin- sister curators, mix well- preserved vintage as diverse as St. John and Fendi with contemporary designs for a one-off look.

The Museum: The museum known as MOBA will never be mistaken for its acronymically similarly New York cousin, MoMA, or the Museum of Modern Art.

The new Stone Hill Center was desined by Pritzker-winner Japanese architect Tadao Ando. The original museum is a glowing white-marble temple desined by Daniel Perry in 1955.