Massachusetts

Restaurants in Massachusetts

Massachusetts restaurants serve up a diverse culinary adventure, and the cuisines vary depending on the region. Coastal restaurants in Massachusetts usually specialize in seafood, while the Berkshires favor French and American cuisine. Every region benefits from the bounty of its rural farmlands. Some of the best restaurants in Massachusetts are taking note.

Situated on Back Bay, Deuxave is a favorite for American and French cuisine. Diners will be happy to find an extensive wine list and sumptuous desserts – try the Chocolate Silk Ribbon. Straight Wharf’s waterfront location is appropriate for this award winning seafood restaurant (voted one of the Best Seafood Restaurants in USA by Travel and Leisure, 2012). Take a stroll along the wharf and browse the shops after dinner to complete the evening. Located in the Theater District, Troquet is an upscale French bistro that’s perfect for a romantic dinner or a bite after the show. It boasts an extensive wine list and a great view of the Common. Mistral offers French-Mediterranean cuisine classics like Dover sole and duck with cherries. Provencal décor and a gorgeous brunch served on Sunday help to make this one of the most popular Massachusetts restaurants.

Never judge a dive bar by its gaudy awning and glaring neon signs. This Allston watering hole’s 30-tap beer wall and daily deals are too good and totally true.

The clink of glasses has replaced the long-ago clink of prison bars at this jail-turned-luxury hotel in Beacon Hill.

This subterranean bar is welcoming in all seasons; it has a sunken patio for outdoor lounging in warm-weather months, and also a roaring indoor fireplace for snowy days.

Beneath the Hotel Commonwealth, this polished and relaxed barroom is home sweet home with plush love seats, coffee-table books for perusing, and framed photos above the fireplace.

The Fairmont Copley Plaza’s well-stocked barroom comes with a vintage wine list sophisticated enough to impress even the most discerning sommeliers. During the winter months, I’m a post-work regular in need of a snug swig from a classic Oak Warmer.

Nine Zero Hotel’s hip, vintage lounge has all the ingredients of a casual, relaxing night in for one good time out. A resident DJ spins the soundtrack for a night of playing board games like Candy Land, Jenga, and even Twister.

Marked by a large, vintage clock suspended over the door, this legendary German beer hall’s antiquated facade stands out on the border of Chinatown.

A Harvard landmark since 1960, this no-frills burger joint isn’t glamorous, though it has made Hollywood cameos in both Good Will Hunting and The Social Network.

This is what happens when Red Sox fans take over a traditional Irish pub.

The fourth-oldest restaurant in Boston was built on Bosworth Street in 1885, and the moody lighting, white marble bar and tiled floors haven’t changed much since. The glassed-in rooftop patio makes a perfect setting for a romantic evening, especially during the 4:00–6:00 p.m.

The oldest restaurant in Boston (which is on the National Register of Historic Places) jumped on the 19th-century oyster craze long before any other raw bars in the city even existed.

This spot is the failsafe date night go-to in the inherently romantic Beacon Hill neighborhood.

From fifty-two stories above Back Bay, this dramatic venue lets you watch night fall over the city while sipping champagne with your sweetie.

Dimly lit, quiet and intimate, this tiny trattoria in North Square has just nine candlelit tables, which seem to be a world away from the usual North End hubbub. Share a bottle of Chianti or Barolo with a couple of tasty small plates from the bar while perusing the menu.

Homey, warm and inviting, this Jamaica Plain restaurant makes dining out feel like a cozy night in. When founder Krista Kranyak first opened it in 2002, she was the only waitress on the floor, and the only one needed.