Massachusetts

Restaurants in Massachusetts

Aiming to serve simple foods paired with the best wines, Bin 26 Enoteca is the quintessential Italian wine bar. Low lighting fills the sleek interior, where wine labels serve as wallpaper and wine bottles serve as décor.

This Brookline outpost of the original Daily Catch, which was established in 1973, offers a quiet neighborhood setting with two front windows overlooking Harvard Street.

About 20 minutes from the city, this unassuming Brookline joint is often lauded as the best sushi restaurant in the Boston area. The no-frills interior is extremely small, with only an eight-seat sushi bar and one additional table beside the front window.

Sip local brew on tap and order a hand-ground burger with chèvre or crab cakes.

The eatery serves solid—as its name would suggest—Tuscan food like roasted organic chicken with fennel, garlic, sage, and olives.

Renowned chef Barbara Lynch, also the owner of Boston’s B&G Oysters and No. 9 Park, draws on her on own memories of traveling in France and Italy to create an innovative dining experience at this Shawmut eatery.

Housed in a nondescript brick building in Central Square, Green Street first opened during the Great Depression and holds Cambridge’s longest-standing liquor license.

What It’s Like: The “Combah,” as it’s affectionately called by
Cape locals, earned its spot in the annals of destination dining when
it opened back in 1978 in what is arguably one of the greatest

Cap’t Cass Rock Harbor Seafood is a funky BYOB in Orleans with wood floors, shelves lined with old seashells, handwritten menus taped to the walls, and colorful buoys covering the exterior. Get there on time because the hours are strict (11 a.m. to 2 p.m.).

Enjoy Gallic classics like wine-braised rabbit with parsnips.

When I first discovered this spot—my stomach grumbling, my wallet light—I nearly wept with joy at the sight of so many steaming, piled up entrees set before me, some for as little as $4.00 a plate.

After the 2008 recession left three local university grads without a job, they banded together to bring Boston the French-fried dinner of your dreams.

This itty-bitty Back Bay corner cafe is best known for waking up the busy Bostonian with a perfectly crafted breakfast sandwich.

Hiding in plain sight on Hanover Street, this Italian joint lets you sate your appetite (and clog your arteries) for not much more than the change you’ll find at the bottom of your purse. Everything on the menu is under $5, from pizza to panini sandwiches and calzones.