Restaurants in Massachusetts

To watch the sunset with a glass of wine in hand, head to the Chart Room Restaurant, a simple seafood haunt in a marina in Cataumet, where crowds gather on the lawn to toast the spectacle.

The eatery serves solid—as its name would suggest—Tuscan food like roasted organic chicken with fennel, garlic, sage, and olives.

The Naked Oyster goes one step farther in its focus on fresh and local: The restaurant has its own oyster beds in the harbor.

The heart of New England cuisine is seafood, and this restaurant keeps the lobsters alive in their multiple hundred-gallon tanks until they’re ordered.

Pushing the boundaries of fusion cuisine, chef Paul O’Connell seamlessly blends French and Cuban flavors at Chez Henri, located near Harvard Square. Behind the bright red façade, the interior has an upscale, urban vibe with dark wood floors, dim lighting, and frosted glass panels.

At the laid-back tavern, locals gather to dine on fresh seafood dishes such as lobster mac and cheese.

Serving pizza in the North End since 1926, Pizzeria Regina is widely considered Boston’s best old-school pizza joint. The no-frills landmark is a casual combo of checkered tablecloths and paper plates, but the pizza is anything but ordinary.

Abba, in Orleans, is widely touted as the Cape’s best restaurant. Israeli-born chef Erez Pinhas dips into his heritage for dishes like falafel in a tahini-amba sauce, then spins the globe to Asia; his shrimp-and-lobster pad thai has a cultlike following.

The town of Essex on the West Side of Cape Ann is famous for fried whole-belly clams. Shabby-chic Woodman’s claims to have invented the treat in 1916.

The upper and lower dining rooms of this East End Provincetown restaurant are as different as day and night. Upstairs, the Tuscany Room includes paintings from the namesake region, while the main room boasts big windows, high ceilings, mirrors, a brick fireplace, and a garden view.

This spot has been serving schnitzels, sauerbraten, and other German delights since 1935.

What It’s Like: The “Combah,” as it’s affectionately called by
Cape locals, earned its spot in the annals of destination dining when
it opened back in 1978 in what is arguably one of the greatest