Massachusetts

Restaurants in Massachusetts

Massachusetts restaurants serve up a diverse culinary adventure, and the cuisines vary depending on the region. Coastal restaurants in Massachusetts usually specialize in seafood, while the Berkshires favor French and American cuisine. Every region benefits from the bounty of its rural farmlands. Some of the best restaurants in Massachusetts are taking note.

Situated on Back Bay, Deuxave is a favorite for American and French cuisine. Diners will be happy to find an extensive wine list and sumptuous desserts – try the Chocolate Silk Ribbon. Straight Wharf’s waterfront location is appropriate for this award winning seafood restaurant (voted one of the Best Seafood Restaurants in USA by Travel and Leisure, 2012). Take a stroll along the wharf and browse the shops after dinner to complete the evening. Located in the Theater District, Troquet is an upscale French bistro that’s perfect for a romantic dinner or a bite after the show. It boasts an extensive wine list and a great view of the Common. Mistral offers French-Mediterranean cuisine classics like Dover sole and duck with cherries. Provencal décor and a gorgeous brunch served on Sunday help to make this one of the most popular Massachusetts restaurants.

Chef Barbara Lynch, the celebrated owner of No. 9 Park and B&G Oysters, continues to impress patrons with this contemporary twist on a traditional diner.

Since its 2007 debut, this Somerville eatery has become a hot spot among locals.

Wicked Oyster's breakfast and coffee bar (available from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.) is one of the eatery's most popular attractions.

Sundae School Ice Cream serves unusual varieties like ginger and has three locations across the Cape: the original in Dennisport, plus outposts in Harwichport and East Orleans.

In the warmer months, the smell of baking cones wafts from this ice cream shop near Steamship Wharf and often encourages a hearty line out the front door.

Pushing the boundaries of fusion cuisine, chef Paul O’Connell seamlessly blends French and Cuban flavors at Chez Henri, located near Harvard Square. Behind the bright red façade, the interior has an upscale, urban vibe with dark wood floors, dim lighting, and frosted glass panels.

Even Boston’s Brahmins go bonkers for this homey neighborhood joint where chef Barry Maiden marries greenmarket sensibility to down-home Appalachian flavors. Haute-cuisine– trained Maiden is an ace with cornmeal-battered oysters and Bourbon-braised pork shoulder.

The local seafood shack has outdoor tables set alongside boat slips.

There are vintage black-and-white photos on the walls and birdhouses hanging in the trees at Schoolhouse Ice Cream & Yogurt, in Harwichport, where the intoxicating rum-raisin and Irish-whiskey flavors are for adults only.

A 70-year-old landmark on the North Shore's "Clam Alley," serving excellent deep-fried bellies beside a tranquil salt marsh.

The upper and lower dining rooms of this East End Provincetown restaurant are as different as day and night. Upstairs, the Tuscany Room includes paintings from the namesake region, while the main room boasts big windows, high ceilings, mirrors, a brick fireplace, and a garden view.

For years a beloved-but-hoary haunt of Siasconset’s upper crust, the “Chanti” was given a new lease on life in 2006.

A showpiece of the renovated Kenmore Square, this nightclub-slick seafood palace is the latest project of local restaurateur Michael Schlow (Radius, Via Matta).