Massachusetts

Restaurants in Massachusetts

Find no-fuss seafood with marina views at Pickering Wharf. At this dockside grill, the New England clam chowder is made with applewood-smoked bacon.

Middle Eastern flavors are the focus of this West Cambridge bakery and café, which specializes in pastries and mezze, or savory small plates. Sofra also sells stuffed flatbreads, shawarma wraps, and several breakfast items including olive oil granola and spiced Persian donuts.

Set in the basement of a Victorian house, Provincetown’s Front Street is owned by Donna Aliperti and Kathleen Cotter, who can usually be seen in the kitchen making dishes like pan-seared salmon with Swiss chard dumplings, white bean coulis, and sage.

Known for its fresh, simply prepared dishes like baked cod, fried prawns, and steamed mussels.

A venerable, family-owned restaurant since 1958, the Galley—where untold numbers of Nantucketers have celebrated their anniversary dinners—got a chic new facelift for its own 50th anniversary this summer.

The Wall of Fame at Moby Dick’s is covered with framed photos of patrons who bought Moby Wear in the gift shop and then sent a picture of themselves wearing the apparel in various U.S. cities.

Although the dining room itself-set in a former sea captain’s house-could use a facelift, the food delivers. Try the seared sea scallops with scallion pancake, napa cabbage, grilled peaches, and smoked bacon.

Try to get a table overlooking the sandy beach at the Ocean House Restaurant, in Dennisport, and go deep into the land of fusion. (Roasted black cod with edamame ravioli and miso-truffle broth, anyone?)

The heart of New England cuisine is seafood, and this restaurant keeps the lobsters alive in their multiple hundred-gallon tanks until they’re ordered.

Set on the Wellfleet town pier, Mac's is a local takeout institution.

Although it has zero atmosphere, Harwichport’s Talk of the Town Café, wedged between a CVS and a hardware store in a strip mall, sells the best cup of chowder on Cape Cod.

The town of Essex on the West Side of Cape Ann is famous for fried whole-belly clams. Shabby-chic Woodman’s claims to have invented the treat in 1916.