Massachusetts

Hotels in Massachusetts

Tucked away on a side street in the downtown area, the Onyx is a Kimpton Group boutique hotel located within 1.5 miles of city highlights like Faneuil Hall, Bunker Hill, and TD Garden.

Popular with families and couples alike, these comfortable accommodations are a smart, affordable choice for those wanting to be close the shore (and who don’t mind walking)—a 3/4-mile path leads directly from the property to Marconi Beach. There’s an indoor pool, too.

Of all the historic houses-turned-inns in Nantucket Town (and there are more of them than you can shake a martini at), this 1770 beauty is by far the most stylish.

A step up from camping, these accommodations aren’t for everyone; the (nonworking) fireplaces bear graffiti marks from former guests, and the cast-iron beds probably date from the hotel’s opening in 1931.

Masculine yet cozy, the 225-room Back Bay Hotel is laden with history: the 1925 limestone edifice with ornate friezes fronts one of Boston’s last Italian Renaissance Revival buildings, which was police headquarters for 70 years.

The hulking 294-room Charles, on the eastern edge of Harvard Square, is the best reason to stay north of the river.

To stand out in the fashion-forward Back Bay, interior designer Frank Nicholson approached the hotel as if it were a gallery. Everything has an artistic touch, from the blond-wood contemporary furniture to the masterpieces by Frank Stella and David Hockney.

It sounds like a setup for a joke—landmark Boston jailhouse converted into luxury hotel. While the property does make all the requisite big-house puns—room service is "solitary dining," the bar is in the former basement drunk tank—it’s more than a gimmick.

With its unmistakable archway and domed rotunda, the 16-story building, set on the main swath of Rowes Wharf, is a city icon.

On a sailboat-filled inlet, the Wequassett Resort & Golf Club, on Pleasant Bay, is Chatham’s other top place to stay. A 1740’s Colonial with lanterns has been converted into the main reception area; most guest rooms are in clapboard cottages scattered throughout 27 acres of gardens.

This refined island inn is actually a complex of ivy-draped 18th- and 19th-century houses secreted among lovingly tended gardens.

Sprinkled throughout the dunes and neighboring woods, the one- to three-bedroom accommodations aren’t much to look at—straight out of the 1950’s, they have knotty pine walls, bamboo furniture, outdoor showers, and screened-in porches—but the price can’t be beat, with rock-bottom weekly rates, eve