Manhattan

Manhattan Travel Guide

At only 30 square miles, Manhattan is a fairly small area to explore, but there are so many things to do in Manhattan you will have a hard time fitting everything in. For art lovers, Manhattan hosts some of the world’s best art museums. For modern art, check out the Museum of Modern Art or the architecturally distinctive Guggenheim Museum, always showcasing amazing special exhibitions. The hallmark New York Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Met, is also a must-see site containing 19 curatorial departments ranging from ancient Egyptian to Asian to European masters. For a different type of art, check out a world famous Broadway show, but make sure to reserve your tickets early because many shows tend to sell out.

Wondering what to do in Manhattan other than art? Try taking a boat cruise through the New York Harbor to Ellis Island and see the iconic Statue of Liberty. Also, one of the top things to do in Manhattan is catching a view of the spectacular city skyline from the Empire State Building or Top of the Rock. If you’re wondering what to do in Manhattan for families, many museum such as the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and the Museum of the Moving Image offer hands-on activities for kids and the New York Hall of Science has a 30,000 square foot outdoor science playground. If the weather is nice, take a stroll through one of Manhattan’s many incredible public parks including Central Park, Washington Square Park or the High Line in Chelsea.

Some buildings are born to be icons. With its unique triangular “iron” shape, Beaux-Arts styling and bragging rights as one of New York’s first skyscrapers, The Flatiron Building’s eternal fame was secured from the beginning.

With seemingly countless galleries lining its streets, Chelsea is essentially a museum—one displaying everything from experimental art from up-and-comers to more staid works by longtime greats.

Tucked away on W. 12th Street, between University Street and Fifth Avenue, is this French-inspired café that has been serving up the neighborhood’s creamiest café au laits for years.

Every New Yorker loves a bar with an outdoor patio, and that’s exactly what you’ll find at Bamboo 52. Add to the mix a sushi bar and a well-priced happy hour, which runs from noon until 9 p.m., and you’ve got the makings of the perfect watering hole.

Members show up regularly for continuing-ed classes or workouts in the 80,000-sq-ft gym, but this is hardly your average community center.

Once the site of a chapel on Peter Stuyvesant’s farm, St. Mark’s is more than just a church: the sanctuary does double duty as a performance space and plays as much a part in the neighborhood’s cultural history as in its history of worship.

If there’s a sport, you can probably play it at this expansive complex set along the Hudson River with facilities for everything from bowling and rock climbing to year-round ice skating and golf (especially popular because you get to whack balls into nets overlooking the water).

The New York flagship features an extensive collection of cameras, film, and accessories.

This beloved shop is a necessary stop for book lovers and anyone interested in the glory days of the East Village.

This floating museum is housed in a former U.S. aircraft carrier that served in WWII and Vietnam War. The ship retired in 1982 and, in that same year, the museum was opened.