Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Occupying the ground floors of two West Village townhouses is the exclusive Waverly Inn & Garden, first opened in 1920 and again in 2006 by Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair, along with Sean MacPherson, Eric Goode, and Emil Varda.

Artie's Delicatessen, on the Upper West Side, is a New York-style deli that serves the flavors of 1930s homestyle Jewish cooking within a modern restaurant painted brightly and playing hip music.

Consistently named among the best Mexican restaurants in Manhattan, El Paso has three uptown locations including this lively outpost on Lexington Avenue. “Authentic” is the restaurant’s watchword: the recipes are not Americanized, and the emphasis is on fresh, traditional ingredients.

A sushi place? For fried chicken? Wince all you like, but once you try the wildly eclectic twist on this southern delicacy, you’ll see. First, the chicken is dredged in a daring invention of matzoh meal, flour, paprika, togarashi peppers, cayenne, and sea salt.

If you ask someone where they want to go out to eat, few consider a museum. The proprietors of Modern, located inside the Museum of Modern Art, aim to change that.

"It's a temple of chicken in midtown Manhattan, the real deal and a long-time chefs' favorite. Head up the stairs and give them your name and telephone number-then have a drink next door at the karaoke joint until they call you.

Inspired by traditional Japanese izakayas (after-work drinking establishments), this Midtown East restaurant specializes in fresh sashimi as well as robata-style cooking on a charcoal grill.

Andrew Carmellini (also behind Tribeca’s buzzed-about Locanda Verde) hits all the right notes at this platonic ideal of the American bistro: oysters, fried chicken with honey and butter–soaked biscuits, a towering sandwich of fried soft-shell crab and kaffir-curry sauce.

Mexico City—born chef Patricio Sandoval reinterprets traditional Mexican cuisine using local ingredients at this East Village taqueria.

Rock star Moby started this Lower East Side cafe with his ex-girlfriend in response to the lack of vegetarian and vegan food in the area. With its soothing white-and-green color palette and natural lighting, it’s something of an oasis for laid-back living in the city.

Fans of Law & Order will recognize the squat brick building and neon-yellow sign of Hector's Cafe and Diner in the Meatpacking District.