Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Just a short hop eastward from Grand Central Station, installed on the basement level of an office building on East 43rd Street, is an authentic Japanese izakaya with a reputation for being one of the best sake bars in the United States.

Situated in the West Village, this family-owned Italian eatery uses recipes passed down for generations and produce from local farms to create fresh, authentic dishes.

The original Il Buco a block away started life as an antique shop and evolved into a homey, well-loved trattoria.

Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto brings superb Japanese and Asian fusion cuisine to the Chelsea neighborhood with his trendy restaurant Morimoto.

One of the city’s few remaining traditional French restaurants, La Grenouille is still a top choice for special occasion dining, more than half a century since its opening in 1962.

Named after former chef-owner Laurent Tourondel (BLT stands for Bistro Laurent Tourondel), this lively restaurant is Tourondel’s take on a modern American steakhouse.

The Hampton Chutney Co. in SoHo serves hot, crispy dosas and doughy uttapas, but it's the fresh, homemade chutneys that make this Indian fare stand out.

Telepan is an Upper West Side restaurant with an earth-friendly theme and a menu that changes with the seasons. Produce is locally sourced, and meats, including the ribeye-for-two, are free-range.

Bombay Talkie, in Chelsea, focuses on two delights from Indian culture: street food and Bollywood. The clean lines of teak wood and black leather and the gallery-style white walls allow for a great display of Bollywood-inspired canvases; one huge mural shows an Indian street dance scene.

The consistent freshness of the fish is what keeps this East Village restaurant afloat in a city full of sushi options.

Few chefs have racked up as many accolades as Babbo’s Mario Batali.

Scarpetta, housed in an unassuming Greek Revival townhome in the Meatpacking District, made its award-winning debut in 2008, following Scott Conant's successful turns at L'Impero and Alto 18+ and cementing his status as one of Manhattan's New York's foremost I

Not surprisingly, the roast duck is the signature dish at Peking Duck House in Chinatown, and little wonder. The preparation of Peking duck is notoriously laborious and complex, and this is one spot that does it well. The skin is rubbed with maltose and roasted in a hot oven.

Located on the corner of Carmine and Bedford Streets in the West Village, this airy restaurant has large windows to take in passers-by. Exposed brick walls, vaulted ceilings, and an open kitchen mark the interior.