Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

With oversize porthole windows and glossy wood paneling, Soho’s Lure Fishbar resembles the cabin of a luxury yacht.

On the corner of 2nd Ave. and 66th St., this Upper East Side Italian restaurant greets guests with a wraparound patio that opens to the main dining room, though most would prefer to sit outside to people watch during warmer months.

For customers leaving this restaurant located in the Meatpacking District, it may be the décor and layout that sticks in the mind instead of the food: No matter how delicious the dishes may be, it’s hard to compete with the charm of three-level, 1848 brownstone town house.

Ronnybook Farms of Columbia County is fast becoming an NYC institution. Chelsea Market plays host to

Located inside the historic 1904 building that once housed the Breslin Hotel and is now home to New York’s Ace Hotel, The Breslin was created by chef April Bloomfield of the Spotted Pig fame.

At this small Upper East Side omakase-only restaurant, diners are greeted by a sign that reads: Today's Special — Trust Me. The small establishment only seats about 30 people at both the bamboo sushi bar and wooden tables.

Located in the heart of Little Italy, Cha Cha’s Café authentic Old World cuisine has been sampled by stars such as Danny De Vito, Tommy Lasorda, Leonard DiCaprio, and Michael Douglas.

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

Few New Yorkers know oysters the way Jay Shaffer does. The Long Island native even raises his own, on beds in Shinnecock Inlet (he sells them here as "Shaffer Cove" oysters).

Tiny, cramped, and lively, this subterranean East Village eatery serves affordable Japanese fare in a no-frills dining room.

Named after a famous Barcelonan market, Boqueria resembles a traditional tapas bar but also offers a range of large dishes, such as seafood paella.