Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

What Great New York Noodle Town in Chinatown lacks in decor, it makes up for in cheap, but good food and speedy service. Hanging meats and chopping blocks take up the front part of this Chinese restaurant and no-frills tables fills the rest.

Cheesemongers can sample more than 40 hand-made cheeses daily from around the world at this small Hell’s Kitchen wine bar. From a stinky blue to the smooth Brie, Casellula pairs each selection with proper condiments at its polished wood bar.

Befitting a Theater District landmark that's appeared in several films, Sardi's red leather booths are surrounded by autographed caricatures of celebrities ranging from Lucille Ball to Hugh Jackman and Kevin Bacon.

Modern-day Marie Antoinettes get their fix of haute-farmhouse chic at BLT Market, the newest (and cleverest) New York addition to Laurent Tourondel's ever-expanding BLT franchise.

Inspired by the eponymous Milanese café established in the 1930’s, Sant Ambroeus serves authentic Italian fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Here, Alex Raij and Bilbao-born Eder Montero (former chefs at the beloved tapas haunt Tía Pol) preach authentic Basque—not Spanish—cooking.

Critics had their doubts that New Yorkers would go for a kaiseki restaurant, a highly ritualized form of traditional Japanese cuisine rooted in ancient Kyoto monasteries.

Installed in a small, sunny storefront in East Harlem, Il Caffe Latte is a tidy, red-brick neighborhood café serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner endeavors to make the dining experience at his Café Sabarsky, located within the Neue Gallerie, as authentically Viennese as possible.

Celebrity chef David Burke’s original restaurant on the Upper East Side has undergone renovation and now reflects the playfulness of the menu.

A cross between a funky Southeast Asian dive bar and a hip West Village restaurant, Fatty Crab is half bright red walls and mismatched tableware, half exposed brick and minimalist lighting.

Taunt curtains that are gathered in the middle line the windows of Primola, a neighborhood Italian restaurant in the Upper East Side.

What began as a speakeasy in Midtown during Prohibition has become one of the most historically significant dining destinations in the country. The three restaurants and ten private rooms serving fine American cuisine have seated every president from Eisenhower to Bush Jr.