Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Now in residence at the St Regis Hotel, Chef Alain Ducasse's latest foray into the New York restaurant scene is a French wine restaurant.

If you haven’t found your neighborhood Vietnamese sandwich shop (everyone should have one), Nicky’s is a good place to begin. If it’s your first time in one of their locations, don’t let its size (tiny) and appearance (ramshackle) put you off. What lies inside is love at first bite.

Opened in 1913, tucked in the vaulted subterranean chambers of Grand Central Station, the Oyster Bar serves two million bivalves a year.

Sometimes it takes an extreme focus to bring about perfection. Such is the case for Pommes Frites in the East Village. True to its name, it only sells fries, but these are fries prepared the Belgian way: fried once for cooking and then twice for a golden color and perfect crispness.

In a homey West Village setting, I had delicious crabmeat with tiny gnocchi in a silky turmeric-onion sauce.

RUB

Short for Righteous Urban Barbeque, RUB is helmed by legendary Kansas City pit master Paul Clark, who grills up tender meat dishes like beef brisket, bacon chunks, and burnt ends at his Chelsea restaurant, and serves them by the pound in metal pie plates and Styrofoam cups.

The restaurant has the city’s most welcoming service, an organic earth-toned design, and a treasure in its creative, French Laundry–trained chef-owner John Fraser, whose haute-humble menu dazzles even with lamb’s tongue and brussels sprouts.

Step beneath Balthazar's red awnings and into the high-ceiling dining room to be welcomed by striking pillars, black on the bottom and textured yellow on the top, with illuminated stained-glass panels in the middle.

Located on Restaurant Row on Frederick Douglass Boulevard, this Harlem eatery serves up refined American entrees alongside upgraded burgers, steak sandwiches, and truffled French fries.