Restaurants in Manhattan

At this restaurant, located smack-dab between Union Square and the historic Flatiron district and occupying a stylishly rusticated space inside the furniture emporium ABC Carpet & Home, Jean-Georges Vongerichten shines the spotlight on farm-to-fork vegetables.

Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto brings superb Japanese and Asian fusion cuisine to the Chelsea neighborhood with his trendy restaurant Morimoto.

Born in Bangkok, chef Pam Panyasiri now brings the flavors of her homeland to Hell’s Kitchen at this no-frills, cash-only café.

Freemans in the lower East Side is easy to miss, as it's tucked at the end of a cobblestone alley with only small hanging lights to guide you.

Located in Manhattan’s Upper East Side, the restaurant’s name is lit above the doorway on an almost neon-green sign.

Housed on the main floor of a trendy Meatpacking District boutique hotel (also called the Standard) and under the High Line elevated public park, the Standard Grill offers New American cuisine by chef Dan Silverman, with signature dishes like charred octopus and marinated cobia.

Located in Chinatown, Pho Grand is a local favorite for authentic Vietnamese food. The restaurant's dining room, made up of cedar-paneled walls and wooden beams, is often filled with patrons who come to enjoy the pho - a rice noodle soup that comes with a choice of meat.

After this 10-table Italian eatery opened in 1896, locals who frequented the family-run establishment were given standing reservations that are still in place today.

The Silverleaf Tavern in Murray Hill puts a new twist on the traditional neighborhood pub. The luxurious interior is accented with leather and exposed brick; high-back mahogany banquettes provide an intimate space for conversation.


The winged logo and sleek metallic and bright red design that front this Chinatown joint set the tone for the whole Dim Sum Go Go experience.