Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar in the East Village gives a nod to New England with its knotty-pine bar, red and white checked walls, seascape paintings, and antique cupboard.

What started out as a small health food store and juice bar has grown into one of the city’s most popular vegan restaurants. Opened in 1984 on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, this eatery serves organic cuisine directly from the farm to the table using mostly locally grown products.

Simple and understated describes both the decor and food at Omai in Chelsea. Black chairs, white tablecloths, and softly glowing lanterns adorn this Vietnamese restaurant.

Despite its nondescript façade and modest interior—furnished with tile floors, small tables, and colorful paintings—this casual midtown eatery is a local go-to for authentic Turkish cuisine.

Umberto Assante founded Da Umberto in 1987, and the restaurant is now run by his son Vittorio Assante, who is committed to maintain his father’s legacy, combining “tradition with innovation.” At Da Umberto, you’ll be served authentic Italian food like raviolaci, pasta stuffed with mushrooms and t

Whether you're dining beneath the trees on the stone patio or amidst the interior's clapboard ceiling and white walls carrying maps of the Atlantic, you may forget that you're in the East Village and not a New England fish shack.

Savor the "cuisine of the sun" at Murray Hill's Artisanal Fromagerie and Bistro, where the Art Deco dining room recalls the calm, confident style of Paris circa 1930, from the antique, mural-sized painting on the back wall to the Parisian-style cheese cave.

For more than 15 years, owner and executive chef William Mattiello has provided the Flatiron neighborhood with simple cuisine from his hometown Modena, Italy.

The relaunch in 2010, following a 15-month hiatus, aims to make the Palm Court more friendly and modern, dropping the jacket requirement and silencing the live harp.

Styled after an old farmhouse, this restaurant on East 10th Street sports a wood-framed exterior with a green awning, providing a rather subtle introduction to what regulars have identified as one of the East Village's dining standards.

For some food that is "real good, real simple", head over to Craft in the Flatiron district. Chef-owner Tom Colicchio, of Bravo's Top Chef fame, focuses on the beautiful simplicity of fresh, single ingredients purchased from the local market and nearby farms.

Daring dishes are the primary focus at this Nolita restaurant, where executive chef Brad Farmerie combines American recipes, Antipodean ingredients, and spices from across the globe.