Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Artisan sandwiches are pre-wrapped and ready to go at this duo of sustainable Battery Park kiosks.

For a Sex in the City moment, stop by Carrie's favorite restaurant, Pastis, in the Meatpacking District.

Marcus Samuelsson’s African-inspired menu is captivating, from the mealie (cornmeal) breads with apricot blatjang (a chutney) to the lassi. What a delight to leave behind the ubiquitous flavors of the Mediterranean and discover these new tastes.

With so many awards under its belt, including Zagat’s eight-year #1 ranking as New York’s favorite restaurant, it’s hard to remain modest. But this Flatiron District establishment maintains a comfortable, urban farmhouse-type atmosphere despite its accolades and well-dressed clientele.

 

Anthos closed for business in August 2010.

Walk through Clinton Street Baking Co.

A tasting menu for two at superchef Thomas Keller's plushly impersonal 16-table dining room overlooking Columbus Circle will last three hours and set you back a cool 500 clams (and that’s not counting drinks). So why are reservations harder to come by than courtside seats for the Knicks?

Situated in Chelsea’s Maritime Hotel, Matsuri fills an unusual niche in the Japanese restaurant scene. For starters, it’s enormous, with high vaulted ceilings, oversize paper lanterns, and a lengthy bar.

Stephen Bruce opened the doors of this New York staple in 1954, charming patrons with his restaurant’s tiffany lamps, café-style small tables, and whimsical touches like the large hanging butterflies on the second floor.

Super-sized pricing and exquisite décor mark this subterranean Japanese restaurant high end for the East Village.

Located in the East Village, this intimate dining spot serves only one option: a prix fixe tasting menu. The two-star Michelin award winning Ko has only 12 seats along a kitchen counter. Along with his staff Chef Peter Serpico serves up innovative American cuisine and a daily rotating menu.

A truly innovative dining concept, Obikà is a restaurant with a menu based entirely on the Mozzarella di Bufala Campana DOP, or mozzarella crafted in the Campania region of Italy.