Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Named after a variety of small, green olives, Picholine is the first restaurant owned by famed chef Terrance Brennan, who formerly served as a saucier at the renowned Le Cirque restaurant.

Dress smartly if heading to Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, an elegant dining room helmed by Ramsay protégé Markus Glocker and installed within Midtown West's high-dollar London NYC Hotel.

The Sant Ambroeus Upper Eastside location seems as though it was designed from top-to-bottom to answer one question: "What do you get when you carve out a slice of Milan and import it on Madison Avenue?" Rich, warm colors reflect in the crystal chandeliers hanging over the wood-paneled banquette—

Telepan is an Upper West Side restaurant with an earth-friendly theme and a menu that changes with the seasons. Produce is locally sourced, and meats, including the ribeye-for-two, are free-range.

Freemans in the lower East Side is easy to miss, as it's tucked at the end of a cobblestone alley with only small hanging lights to guide you.

In the heart of NYC’s Greenwich Village sits this neighborhood favorite. Established in 1977, Knickerbocker Bar & Grill features wood-paneled walls filled with memorabilia like original caricatures by Al Hirschfield and copies of the Saturday Evening Post.

Pretty young things flirt by the light of flickering votives in this fabulously romantic brick-walled space that evokes a 1920's speakeasy half-hidden on a forlorn stretch of the Lower East Side.

When it comes to wings, most people go buffalo. But next time you’re strolling down West 19th Street in the Flatiron District, stop by Tebaya for the Japanese version.

Art Deco-designed Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron District offers a unique method of ordering food. Customers choose four principal ingredients from a list of 16 and then share their thoughts and preferences regarding the meal.

Occupying the ground floors of two West Village townhouses is the exclusive Waverly Inn & Garden, first opened in 1920 and again in 2006 by Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair, along with Sean MacPherson, Eric Goode, and Emil Varda.

Inside Manhattan’s Meatpacking district sits the massive, 16,000-square-foot Buddakan, an Asian fusion restaurant, in what used to be a Nabisco cookie factory.