Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

A standout in a neighborhood crowded with Indian restaurants, this discreet establishment packs in the midtown Manhattan lunch crowd.

“Who loves you?” sings Frankie Valli in the legendary Little Owl restaurant in Greenwich Village. The answer is Rosie Bova’s three grandsons—Lou, Joey, and Mikey. Together, they’ve earned wild success, with lines out the door just a few weeks after opening.

Zak Pelaccio is a shaggy, pork-loving genius whose food takes elements of laid-back locavorism, the slow-smoke traditions of southern BBQ, and the sweet, spicy, fermented goodness of Southeast Asia and cobbles together a witty, funky, and yes, deliciously fatty style all his own.

Chef Iacopo Falai's brilliant trifecta of Italian eateries illuminates the culinary scene in SoHo. Although his main restaurant is temporarily closed, the cafe and bakery remain neighborhood favorites as they bring gourmet Italian fare to your power breakfast or lunch hour. The menu shines just a

In 2005, Robert De Niro convinced famous Japanese chef Nobu Matsuhisa to bring his unique style of Asian fusion to midtown New York (De Niro is now a co-owner).

The French-inspired Japanese cuisine at Geisha, in the upper East Side, is at once complex and elegant, as is the ambiance.

Inspired by the owners’ experiences drinking afternoon tea in locations around the globe and the whimsical story of Alice in Wonderland, Alice’s Tea Cup is a magical New York City tea room.

Location, location, location: this is what the View certainly has. A glass elevator whisks diners up to the 48th floor to the only revolving rooftop restaurant in New York.

Easy to miss, this unassuming West Village restaurant is located inside an unmarked, 100-year-old brownstone. After entering through the dimly lit basement, diners step upstairs to the intimate, candle-lit dining room that feels reminiscent of a dinner party.

Walking into Megu in Tribeca, you might be forgiven for thinking you’d mistakenly entered a museum, gallery, cultural center, or all of the above.

After training at such renowned French restaurants as Le Cirque, Daniel, and Chanterelle, chef Adam Perry Lang switched gears and opened this casual, cafeteria-style barbecue joint in Hell’s Kitchen.

If this restaurant had an official slogan, it might be “come for the view, stay for the food.” Located on the 35th floor of the Time Warner Center in the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Asiate presents a stunning view of Columbus Circle and Central Park through floor-to-ceiling windows.