Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

A riff on the deliterias that dominate in Midtown, this rabbi-supervised Kosher deli is located not far from the Diamond District. Serving old-school lunch and breakfast fare, Milk and Honey sells everything from sandwiches and salads to pizzia, even sushi.

If you haven’t found your neighborhood Vietnamese sandwich shop (everyone should have one), Nicky’s is a good place to begin. If it’s your first time in one of their locations, don’t let its size (tiny) and appearance (ramshackle) put you off. What lies inside is love at first bite.

Few New Yorkers know oysters the way Jay Shaffer does. The Long Island native even raises his own, on beds in Shinnecock Inlet (he sells them here as "Shaffer Cove" oysters).

This small, easy-to-miss spot in Midtown East is just a few quick strides from Grand Central and is the ideal pit stop for a quick lunch break or relaxed dinner.

The namesake of acclaimed chef Daniel Boulud, this New French restaurant is often lauded as one of the best in the nation. Situated in the Upper East Side, Daniel was renovated in 2008 by celebrated designer Adam D.

Neon signs advertising Blue Smoke’s specialties—barbecue and jazz—mark the entrance of this bustling, roadhouse-style eatery in the Flatiron district. Inside, exposed brick walls and red vinyl booths are illuminated by star-shaped light fixtures, large windows, and slanted skylights.

Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his smart Italian wine list and herbal-infused cocktails at this always-packed new restaurant prove otherwise. Drinks $15.

TV Chef Mario Batali and partner Joe Bastianich are better known for their true-to-form Italian restaurants, but their sole Spanish adventure, Casa Mono, had an immediate impact on the New York dining scene upon opening in 2004.

The restaurant has the city’s most welcoming service, an organic earth-toned design, and a treasure in its creative, French Laundry–trained chef-owner John Fraser, whose haute-humble menu dazzles even with lamb’s tongue and brussels sprouts.

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"British-born Annie Wayte, one of New York's great unsung chefs, creates soulful soups and beautiful greenmarket salads at this whimsically rusticated café inside Nicole Farhi's Chelsea Market boutique.

Named after the legendary Harlem speakeasy, Red Rooster Harlem serves up sophisticated soul food. Menus reflect the diverse population of the neighborhood as well as the background of Swedish chef, Marcus Samuelsson as you’ll see on the menu which includes Fried Yard Bird and Helga’s Meatballs.