Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

In the heart of NYC’s Greenwich Village sits this neighborhood favorite. Established in 1977, Knickerbocker Bar & Grill features wood-paneled walls filled with memorabilia like original caricatures by Al Hirschfield and copies of the Saturday Evening Post.

Tired of watching customers slathering soy sauce on his sushi, thereby destroying the delicate interplay of flavors, chef Masatoshi “Gari” Sugio came up with a novel concept of infusing his rolls with soy sauce during preparation—and that’s just the beginning.

Pretty young things flirt by the light of flickering votives in this fabulously romantic brick-walled space that evokes a 1920's speakeasy half-hidden on a forlorn stretch of the Lower East Side.

Since 1914, four different generations of the Russ family have owned this gourmet shop on Houston Street in the Lower East Side.

Art Deco-designed Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron District offers a unique method of ordering food. Customers choose four principal ingredients from a list of 16 and then share their thoughts and preferences regarding the meal.

Inside Manhattan’s Meatpacking district sits the massive, 16,000-square-foot Buddakan, an Asian fusion restaurant, in what used to be a Nabisco cookie factory.

Freemans in the lower East Side is easy to miss, as it's tucked at the end of a cobblestone alley with only small hanging lights to guide you.

Flor de Mayo, on the Upper West Side, serves Chinese, Spanish and Peruvian cuisine from noon to midnight daily and enjoys a good reputation for its portion sizes and value. The pollo a la brasa, Peruvian rotisserie chicken, is a signature dish.

A large cow sculpture suspended in front of the brick façade marks the entrance of the Old Homestead, New York’s first steakhouse.

With fun, kitschy, Americana décor and a comfort-food-only menu, Chat n’ Chew is just the spot when you’ve got a craving for Mom’s mashed potatoes and she's 1,000 miles away.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.