Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Combining a lively, party-like atmosphere with gourmet Mexican cuisine, Dos Caminos is a popular spot for after-work drinks, birthday celebrations, and group dining.

This cafeteria-style Union Square spot is a late-night favorite for burgers and booze-spiked milkshakes.

Occupying a former bodega in Lower Manhattan, WD~50 is acclaimed chef Wylie Dufresne's first venture where he is both the owner and chef.

We do love Jody Williams’s sweet, expertly curated, and dollhouse-scaled taste of idealized France in the West Village.

Born in Bangkok, chef Pam Panyasiri now brings the flavors of her homeland to Hell’s Kitchen at this no-frills, cash-only café.

You may have heard of architect Richard Meier’s West Village glass apartment towers, renowned for their famous residents, sleek design, and views of the Hudson. Now you can eat in one, at celebrity chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Perry Street restaurant.

Rolf Babiel opened the Midtown Hallo Berlin food cart in 1981 (the first of its kind in New York) and soon after, it became affectionately and widely known as as New York's "wurst pushcart." Start with the Freakin' Deal: one wurst and one Bavarian meatball sandwich on a crusty roll, with

Opened in 2001 in New York City's Upper West Side, Ouest Restaurant serves up Nouveau American cuisine. Inside the well-lit dining room, red-and-white-striped pendant lamps hang from the vaulted ceiling, and circular red leather booths create an intimate experience.

It's unclear what is the greater attraction at Schiller's Liquor Bar in the lower East Side: the food, the innovative cocktails, or the people-watching.

This spare yet cozy East Village joint, endearingly decorated with old agricultural implements and populated by bearded neo-bohemians, is the brainchild of Peter Hoffman, who was championing sustainable agriculture at Savoy long before the current farm-to-table trend swept up New York.

This sleek, wooden East Village noodle bar has the right kind of hype—not the high-gloss, flashy, media type, but the street level, word-of-mouth kind. The reason?

Sister restaurant to the Harrison, this Chelsea hotspot was established by chef Jimmy Bradley in 1999. Red and white barn siding lines the interior, where wooden furniture and vibrant local art are illuminated by large hanging lanterns.

"For a taste of after-dark Tokyo-style eating in New York, I often find myself at Hagi. Not only is it hidden down a set of stairs just off Times Square (and a couple of blocks from my restaurant Insieme) but it's also crowded with Japanese diners, which is always a good sign.