Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

With a mile-long list of accolades and awards—and even longer waits for stools at his East Village dining bars—the Korean-American cook David Chang is New York’s favorite chef du jour.

Named after a variety of small, green olives, Picholine is the first restaurant owned by famed chef Terrance Brennan, who formerly served as a saucier at the renowned Le Cirque restaurant.

Styled after a country estate, restaurateur Keith McNally’s Waverly Place trattoria frames its rustic furnishings—farmhouse-style tables and chairs and old wooden cabinets—within a space that features weathered brick columns and wooden ceiling beams warmly illuminated by candlestick-shade chandel

Tarallucci e Vino famously operates under the philosophy that "generally, appetizers and desserts are the most interesting items on the menu," and to that effect they warmly welcome patrons seeking no more than a stellar glass of wine and a plate of artisanal cheeses.

Located in Chelsea, Tia Pol serves hearty tapas and Spanish cuisine. Wide front doors open into the small, brick-walled bar and restaurant; above the bar, there is a selection of Spanish wines.

Patsy's Pizzeria first opened its doors in 1933 in East Harlem and has been making "old world" style pizza ever since. The thin crust, oven-baked pizza anchors the full Italian menu, which includes calzones, pasta and salads, and all of the mozzarella is homemade.

EN Japanese Brasserie in the West Village offers izakaya dining in a setting explicitly crafted to evoke the Tokyo experience. Lofty ceilings and large windows give way to intricate wood carvings, floral centerpieces, and block-printed fabrics.

Located on the ground floor of the Carlyle Hotel, this Upper East Side institution is known for headlining the top musical talents, including the legendary Bobby Short, who played at the venue for more than 30 years.

If there is one thing this West Village restaurant doesn’t need, it’s more press. Since opening the city’s first gastro pub in 2004, chef April Bloomfield has won accolades galore with her seasonal British and Italian dishes.

Packed since the day it was launched in December 2007 by a trio of Bouley veterans, Bar Blanc exudes a grown-up glamour and self-assurance rarely seen in this era of slacker neighborhood joints.

When it comes to wings, most people go buffalo. But next time you’re strolling down West 19th Street in the Flatiron District, stop by Tebaya for the Japanese version.

Thirty-five years ago, Eileen Weinberg opened a take-out eatery under an arcade on the western edge of the Broadway Theatre District, where she offered home-style comfort food at a gourmet level and used only the freshest ingredients.

Housed on the main floor of a trendy Meatpacking District boutique hotel (also called the Standard) and under the High Line elevated public park, the Standard Grill offers New American cuisine by chef Dan Silverman, with signature dishes like charred octopus and marinated cobia.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.