Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Named after a type of thyme that grows in the hills of Tuscany, Pepoline’s is a neighborhood trattoria in TriBeCa. The bi-level space run by chef-owners Patrizio Siddu and Enzo Pezone is comprised of tiled floors, light wood and brick accents, close-together tables, and a patio dining area.

Styled after an old farmhouse, this restaurant on East 10th Street sports a wood-framed exterior with a green awning, providing a rather subtle introduction to what regulars have identified as one of the East Village's dining standards.

The relaunch in 2010, following a 15-month hiatus, aims to make the Palm Court more friendly and modern, dropping the jacket requirement and silencing the live harp.

For some food that is "real good, real simple", head over to Craft in the Flatiron district. Chef-owner Tom Colicchio, of Bravo's Top Chef fame, focuses on the beautiful simplicity of fresh, single ingredients purchased from the local market and nearby farms.

Daring dishes are the primary focus at this Nolita restaurant, where executive chef Brad Farmerie combines American recipes, Antipodean ingredients, and spices from across the globe.

Simple and understated describes both the decor and food at Omai in Chelsea. Black chairs, white tablecloths, and softly glowing lanterns adorn this Vietnamese restaurant.

Umberto Assante founded Da Umberto in 1987, and the restaurant is now run by his son Vittorio Assante, who is committed to maintain his father’s legacy, combining “tradition with innovation.” At Da Umberto, you’ll be served authentic Italian food like raviolaci, pasta stuffed with mushrooms and t

Despite its nondescript façade and modest interior—furnished with tile floors, small tables, and colorful paintings—this casual midtown eatery is a local go-to for authentic Turkish cuisine.

Savor the "cuisine of the sun" at Murray Hill's Artisanal Fromagerie and Bistro, where the Art Deco dining room recalls the calm, confident style of Paris circa 1930, from the antique, mural-sized painting on the back wall to the Parisian-style cheese cave.

Whether you're dining beneath the trees on the stone patio or amidst the interior's clapboard ceiling and white walls carrying maps of the Atlantic, you may forget that you're in the East Village and not a New England fish shack.

For more than 15 years, owner and executive chef William Mattiello has provided the Flatiron neighborhood with simple cuisine from his hometown Modena, Italy.

The original Il Buco a block away started life as an antique shop and evolved into a homey, well-loved trattoria.

One of the city’s few remaining traditional French restaurants, La Grenouille is still a top choice for special occasion dining, more than half a century since its opening in 1962.