Restaurants in Manhattan

Tiny, cramped, and lively, this subterranean East Village eatery serves affordable Japanese fare in a no-frills dining room.

You may have heard of architect Richard Meier’s West Village glass apartment towers, renowned for their famous residents, sleek design, and views of the Hudson. Now you can eat in one, at celebrity chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Perry Street restaurant.

Rolf Babiel opened the Midtown Hallo Berlin food cart in 1981 (the first of its kind in New York) and soon after, it became affectionately and widely known as as New York's "wurst pushcart." Start with the Freakin' Deal: one wurst and one Bavarian meatball sandwich on a crusty roll, with

A favorite on the Upper East Side (due mostly to the lack of Vietnamese options), Vermicelli offers the standard fare and take out service like most restaurants of its kind; however, it differs in that it creates a more upscale dining experience with worn wood floors, clothed tables, and maroon v

Location, location, location: this is what the View certainly has. A glass elevator whisks diners up to the 48th floor to the only revolving rooftop restaurant in New York.

Though little more than curved counter and an assembly line of La Marzocco machines, this Chelsea Market cafe quickly serves some of New York's best-reviewed espressos, cappuccinos, and coffee drinks.

When it comes to wings, most people go buffalo. But next time you’re strolling down West 19th Street in the Flatiron District, stop by Tebaya for the Japanese version.


Anthos closed for business in August 2010.

Situated on 5th Avenue in the historic and affluent Upper East Side, Le Caprice is the stateside cousin of a famous brasserie in London with the same name.

Woks and fryers have no place in the open kitchen that dominates this tiny café, where the emphasis is on grilled and steamed pan-Asian dishes flavored with bold sauces, such as garlic lime chili and curry peanut.

Positioned on the corner of Ave. A and East 9th St. in Alphabet City, this café is filled with mismatched chairs and makeshift tables arranged over worn wood floors. Random cupboards store mugs and serve as the coffee condiment bar, adding to the antique-shop appeal of the restaurant.

Sushi Seki is a comfortable, no-frills restaurant in the upper East Side, with green-tea colored walls and a plain wooden sushi bar. In lieu of a dazzlying atmosphere, the focus is on some of the most loved Japanese food in the city.