Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

A restaurant in trendy TriBeCa, Marc Murphy's Landmarc is well known for its mix of nouveau French and Italian 

For customers leaving this restaurant located in the Meatpacking District, it may be the décor and layout that sticks in the mind instead of the food: No matter how delicious the dishes may be, it’s hard to compete with the charm of three-level, 1848 brownstone town house.

At this small Upper East Side omakase-only restaurant, diners are greeted by a sign that reads: Today's Special — Trust Me. The small establishment only seats about 30 people at both the bamboo sushi bar and wooden tables.

Here, Alex Raij and Bilbao-born Eder Montero (former chefs at the beloved tapas haunt Tía Pol) preach authentic Basque—not Spanish—cooking.

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

Hosts Mario Zarate and Julio Quevedo want all their guests to feel the Amor Cubano (Cuban love) in everything at this Spanish Harlem restaurant which has been serving traditional Cuban food since 2007.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

With oversize porthole windows and glossy wood paneling, Soho’s Lure Fishbar resembles the cabin of a luxury yacht.

On the corner of 2nd Ave. and 66th St., this Upper East Side Italian restaurant greets guests with a wraparound patio that opens to the main dining room, though most would prefer to sit outside to people watch during warmer months.

Ronnybook Farms of Columbia County is fast becoming an NYC institution. Chelsea Market plays host to

Styled after a country estate, restaurateur Keith McNally’s Waverly Place trattoria frames its rustic furnishings—farmhouse-style tables and chairs and old wooden cabinets—within a space that features weathered brick columns and wooden ceiling beams warmly illuminated by candlestick-shade chandel

Located in the Upper West Side and, more importantly, on the top floor of the Museum of Arts and Design, Robert (named for famed party planner Robert Isabell) is predictably posh and trendy.