Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

 

Occupying the ground floors of two West Village townhouses is the exclusive Waverly Inn & Garden, first opened in 1920 and again in 2006 by Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair, along with Sean MacPherson, Eric Goode, and Emil Varda.

Located on West 43rd Street at the edge of Manhattan’s Theater District, this Southern Italian restaurant is easy to spot thanks to prominent blue signage that announces “Esca” (Italian for "bait") in bold white letters underneath slender, curved lamps.

The latest from the burgeoning Momofuku restaurant empire, fiercely gifted executive chef Tien Ho offers French-Vietnamese cuisine in Midtown Manhattan.

This Old World trattoria, with its rustic wood floor, marble-topped bar, antique wooden tables, fancy chandeliers, textured walls, and wine bottle-lined shelves, seems a world (and a few decades) removed from its East 90 address, which puts it in thick of one of Manhattan's most affluent neighbor

More than 900 bottles of fine spirits, including the city’s largest scotch collection, line the backlit “bookshelves” at this Tribeca lounge.

From homemade Belgian waffles to 30-plus Belgian beers—many of which are used to prepare authentic dishes—this Chelsea brasserie serves the best of Belgium’s traditional fare.

Cuban and Mexican prove a wining combination at this lively little Nolita café. The ambience starts with bright blue exterior and extends indoors with colorful tiles and a stainless steel counter, resulting in a kind of cross-cultural diner effect.

After going through an ownership change in 2010, Won Jo became New Won Jo and with the new name came a kitchen overhaul, a new venting system for the Korean grills, and a revitalized menu.

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A famous grump and short-order cook, Kenny Shopshin is one of those only-in-New-York characters tolerated for his culinary skills. Formerly of Shopshin's Diner in the West Village, the infamous grouch now plies his wares in a bright, but cramped, corner of the Essex Street Market.