Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

The lack of space, or chairs, allows you to focus on the perfect cup of coffee at Abraco's Espresso Bar in the East Village. In the tiny but cheerful bar, famous barista and co-owner Jamie McCormick grinds and brews each cup of coffee to order.

Ensconced in a converted garage in the Meatpacking District that once housed Rolls Royces, Barbuto serves brick oven Italian fare in a refreshingly simple atmosphere of red and white brick and clean, decorative lines.

Cheesemongers can sample more than 40 hand-made cheeses daily from around the world at this small Hell’s Kitchen wine bar. From a stinky blue to the smooth Brie, Casellula pairs each selection with proper condiments at its polished wood bar.

What Great New York Noodle Town in Chinatown lacks in decor, it makes up for in cheap, but good food and speedy service. Hanging meats and chopping blocks take up the front part of this Chinese restaurant and no-frills tables fills the rest.

Modern-day Marie Antoinettes get their fix of haute-farmhouse chic at BLT Market, the newest (and cleverest) New York addition to Laurent Tourondel's ever-expanding BLT franchise.

Befitting a Theater District landmark that's appeared in several films, Sardi's red leather booths are surrounded by autographed caricatures of celebrities ranging from Lucille Ball to Hugh Jackman and Kevin Bacon.

Inspired by the eponymous Milanese café established in the 1930’s, Sant Ambroeus serves authentic Italian fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

An homage to classic New York butcher shops, Quality Meats serves prime beef from two locally renowned butchers—Milton Abeles and Strassburger Meats.

The French-inspired Japanese cuisine at Geisha, in the upper East Side, is at once complex and elegant, as is the ambiance.

Easy to miss, this unassuming West Village restaurant is located inside an unmarked, 100-year-old brownstone. After entering through the dimly lit basement, diners step upstairs to the intimate, candle-lit dining room that feels reminiscent of a dinner party.

Location, location, location: this is what the View certainly has. A glass elevator whisks diners up to the 48th floor to the only revolving rooftop restaurant in New York.

The Big Apple has become a barbecue battleground lately, but our award for the smokiest, juiciest cue goes to this big raucous space that seems to have been airlifted from Texas, lock, stock, and smokehouse.

Walking into Megu in Tribeca, you might be forgiven for thinking you’d mistakenly entered a museum, gallery, cultural center, or all of the above.

“Who loves you?” sings Frankie Valli in the legendary Little Owl restaurant in Greenwich Village. The answer is Rosie Bova’s three grandsons—Lou, Joey, and Mikey. Together, they’ve earned wild success, with lines out the door just a few weeks after opening.