Restaurants in Manhattan

You know an ethnic restaurant is good when its tables are filled with natives. When it comes to Ethiopian food, Awash in New York’s Upper West Side is something of a gold standard.

A riff on the deliterias that dominate in Midtown, this rabbi-supervised Kosher deli is located not far from the Diamond District. Serving old-school lunch and breakfast fare, Milk and Honey sells everything from sandwiches and salads to pizzia, even sushi.

Salumeria Rosi may be the only restaurant in the city with an in-house salumiere, who oversees the kitchen's selection of cured-meats and curates tasting platters.

Located on Restaurant Row on Frederick Douglass Boulevard, this Harlem eatery serves up refined American entrees alongside upgraded burgers, steak sandwiches, and truffled French fries.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

Located in Chelsea, not far from the West Chelsea Gallery Scene, Bottino's serves Tuscan fare. Inside, the restaurant has mid-century modern decor with white painted brick walls lined with pots of flowers.

Barbarini’s Alimentari has been serving authentic Italian cuisine to South Street Seaport diners since 2006. The brick-walled restaurant has a few tiny tables under expansive skylights, which cultivate a bright ambiance framed by rusticity.

This smartly decorated Japanese restaurant and bar with an Irish-pub feel benefits from its location in the heart of Chelsea’s gallery scene.

Dinner at Torrisi Italian Specialties represents some of the best Italian dining in the Nolita neighborhood, and for those who know Mulberry Street, that's saying quite a lot. Less upscale and stuffy, Torrisi serves a meal more akin to a family Sunday supper replete with six courses.

Named after a famous Barcelonan market, Boqueria resembles a traditional tapas bar but also offers a range of large dishes, such as seafood paella.

Mexico City—born chef Patricio Sandoval reinterprets traditional Mexican cuisine using local ingredients at this East Village taqueria.