Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Step beneath Balthazar's red awnings and into the high-ceiling dining room to be welcomed by striking pillars, black on the bottom and textured yellow on the top, with illuminated stained-glass panels in the middle.

Jonathan Benno, the former chef de cuisine at the Michelin three-starred Per Se opened Lincoln in 2010. Housed in a glass-encased space designed by architects Diller Scofidio & Renfro, the restaurant is amping up the appeal of the world's largest performing-arts complex.

Billed as the “soufflé sanctuary,” this classic French bistro is housed in TriBeCa’s 1891 Fleming Smith Warehouse, a tall structure with green-trimmed gables and Romanesque-style arches.

A truly innovative dining concept, Obikà is a restaurant with a menu based entirely on the Mozzarella di Bufala Campana DOP, or mozzarella crafted in the Campania region of Italy.

Red neon letters above a striped awning and patio tables announce the West Broadway address of this popular TriBeCa gathering spot.

The latest from the burgeoning Momofuku restaurant empire, fiercely gifted executive chef Tien Ho offers French-Vietnamese cuisine in Midtown Manhattan.

Considered one of New York’s elite restaurants, Le Bernardin is the epitome of a chic, white-tablecloth French restaurant in Manhattan. With its honey-colored wood paneling and leather and steel chairs, the atmosphere exudes modern elegance.

A large cow sculpture suspended in front of the brick façade marks the entrance of the Old Homestead, New York’s first steakhouse.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

With fun, kitschy, Americana décor and a comfort-food-only menu, Chat n’ Chew is just the spot when you’ve got a craving for Mom’s mashed potatoes and she's 1,000 miles away.