Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

When you want a meal consisting of comfort food like mom used to cook, head over to the Kitchenette Uptown in Morningside Heights. The diner has a cottage feel, with pink polka dot wainscoting, a black and white tiled floor, and tables made with salvaged doors.

Aureole is an upscale New York Theater District restaurant in the Bank of America Tower. It's the flagship for restaurant entrepreneur Charlie Palmer, who supports the farm-to-table food movement and specializes in Progressive American cuisine.

Legend has it that ice cream was invented in China about 1500 years ago, so it makes sense that one of Chinatown’s oldest businesses is the Chinese Ice Cream Factory.

Spanning three stories in the heart of Times Square, this lively Midtown destination for the pre- and post-theater crowds is a great spot for celebrity watching.

Named after a style of country house found in the south of France, Mas is a French-inspired eatery in the heart of New York’s Greenwich Village. The ambiance is rustic chic, with unfinished wooden floorboards and paneling and low lighting.

Located in Chinatown, Pho Grand is a local favorite for authentic Vietnamese food. The restaurant's dining room, made up of cedar-paneled walls and wooden beams, is often filled with patrons who come to enjoy the pho - a rice noodle soup that comes with a choice of meat.

After this 10-table Italian eatery opened in 1896, locals who frequented the family-run establishment were given standing reservations that are still in place today.

Inside Manhattan’s Meatpacking district sits the massive, 16,000-square-foot Buddakan, an Asian fusion restaurant, in what used to be a Nabisco cookie factory.

Freemans in the lower East Side is easy to miss, as it's tucked at the end of a cobblestone alley with only small hanging lights to guide you.