Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Now in residence at the St Regis Hotel, Chef Alain Ducasse's latest foray into the New York restaurant scene is a French wine restaurant.

Sitting down in the ultra-swank Kittichai on the ground floor of 60 Thompson Hotel in SoHo, you might get the impression that the restaurant itself is flirting with you.

"It's a temple of chicken in midtown Manhattan, the real deal and a long-time chefs' favorite. Head up the stairs and give them your name and telephone number-then have a drink next door at the karaoke joint until they call you.

Andrew Carmellini (also behind Tribeca’s buzzed-about Locanda Verde) hits all the right notes at this platonic ideal of the American bistro: oysters, fried chicken with honey and butter–soaked biscuits, a towering sandwich of fried soft-shell crab and kaffir-curry sauce.

What began as a lone fruit and vegetable stand in 1933 is now a multistory gourmet grocery store in the Upper West Side, known for its vast displays of prime meats, artisan cheeses, fresh produce, and imported goods from across the globe.

Residing in a Flatiron townhouse, the fish and seafood edition of Laurent Tourondel’s BLT franchise (others include BLT steak in Midtown and Gramercy's BLT prime) features walnut tables, an open kitchen, and a retractable glass roof on the third floor.

With so many awards under its belt, including Zagat’s eight-year #1 ranking as New York’s favorite restaurant, it’s hard to remain modest. But this Flatiron District establishment maintains a comfortable, urban farmhouse-type atmosphere despite its accolades and well-dressed clientele.

RUB

Short for Righteous Urban Barbeque, RUB is helmed by legendary Kansas City pit master Paul Clark, who grills up tender meat dishes like beef brisket, bacon chunks, and burnt ends at his Chelsea restaurant, and serves them by the pound in metal pie plates and Styrofoam cups.

Step beneath Balthazar's red awnings and into the high-ceiling dining room to be welcomed by striking pillars, black on the bottom and textured yellow on the top, with illuminated stained-glass panels in the middle.

Jonathan Benno, the former chef de cuisine at the Michelin three-starred Per Se opened Lincoln in 2010. Housed in a glass-encased space designed by architects Diller Scofidio & Renfro, the restaurant is amping up the appeal of the world's largest performing-arts complex.