Restaurants in Manhattan

Artisan sandwiches are pre-wrapped and ready to go at this duo of sustainable Battery Park kiosks.

Whether you're dining beneath the trees on the stone patio or amidst the interior's clapboard ceiling and white walls carrying maps of the Atlantic, you may forget that you're in the East Village and not a New England fish shack.

Spanning three stories in the heart of Times Square, this lively Midtown destination for the pre- and post-theater crowds is a great spot for celebrity watching.

Congee Village, on the outskirts of Chinatown, offers an extensive menu of more than 250 classic Cantonese dishes. As the name suggests, the restaurant is best known for its congee, or rice porridge; options include the chicken and black mushroom.

Portuguese-American chef George Mendes’s menu (the most perfect salt-cod croquettes west of Iberia; refined-rustic rice studded with bits of chorizo, olives, and duck confit and cracklings) is a succession of highs.

Rock star Moby started this Lower East Side cafe with his ex-girlfriend in response to the lack of vegetarian and vegan food in the area. With its soothing white-and-green color palette and natural lighting, it’s something of an oasis for laid-back living in the city.

Fans of Law & Order will recognize the squat brick building and neon-yellow sign of Hector's Cafe and Diner in the Meatpacking District.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

Sure, Danny Meyer has his multi-award-winning fine-dining establishments, but his fans' most unabashed adoration has been reserved for his contemporary, urban rendition of the roadside pit stop. Shake Shack is an ode to two of his most beloved St.

A famous grump and short-order cook, Kenny Shopshin is one of those only-in-New-York characters tolerated for his culinary skills. Formerly of Shopshin's Diner in the West Village, the infamous grouch now plies his wares in a bright, but cramped, corner of the Essex Street Market.

Patience grasshopper, there are some restaurants where experience trumps food. In the Time Warner Center in Columbus Circle, you’ll be transported up the escalators to an ethereal realm where chef Masa creates one of the premier dining experiences in the world.

Critics had their doubts that New Yorkers would go for a kaiseki restaurant, a highly ritualized form of traditional Japanese cuisine rooted in ancient Kyoto monasteries.

Befitting a Theater District landmark that's appeared in several films, Sardi's red leather booths are surrounded by autographed caricatures of celebrities ranging from Lucille Ball to Hugh Jackman and Kevin Bacon.

Styling itself as the "home of Cuban cuisine" in New York, Margon is a neighborhood favorite for its authentic fare and unpretentious atmosphere.