Restaurants in Manhattan

Translated, Parea means “a group of friends.” It’s a fitting name for this Flatiron neighborhood bistro, which serves small plates of Greek fare, meant to be shared amongst friends.

Barbarini’s Alimentari has been serving authentic Italian cuisine to South Street Seaport diners since 2006. The brick-walled restaurant has a few tiny tables under expansive skylights, which cultivate a bright ambiance framed by rusticity.

A riff on the deliterias that dominate in Midtown, this rabbi-supervised Kosher deli is located not far from the Diamond District. Serving old-school lunch and breakfast fare, Milk and Honey sells everything from sandwiches and salads to pizzia, even sushi.

Chef Michael White’s third New York City restaurant, Marea, is, as the name implies, a tribute to the harmonious union of seafood and Italian cuisine. Located on Central Park South, Marea features a subdued, yet inviting dining room with warm yellow accent walls behind the bar and booths.

Hosts Mario Zarate and Julio Quevedo want all their guests to feel the Amor Cubano (Cuban love) in everything at this Spanish Harlem restaurant which has been serving traditional Cuban food since 2007.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his smart Italian wine list and herbal-infused cocktails at this always-packed new restaurant prove otherwise. Drinks $15.


This smartly decorated Japanese restaurant and bar with an Irish-pub feel benefits from its location in the heart of Chelsea’s gallery scene.