Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Red neon letters above a striped awning and patio tables announce the West Broadway address of this popular TriBeCa gathering spot.

Considered one of New York’s elite restaurants, Le Bernardin is the epitome of a chic, white-tablecloth French restaurant in Manhattan. With its honey-colored wood paneling and leather and steel chairs, the atmosphere exudes modern elegance.

A large cow sculpture suspended in front of the brick façade marks the entrance of the Old Homestead, New York’s first steakhouse.

A restaurant in trendy TriBeCa, Marc Murphy's Landmarc is well known for its mix of nouveau French and Italian 

Sushi Seki is a comfortable, no-frills restaurant in the upper East Side, with green-tea colored walls and a plain wooden sushi bar. In lieu of a dazzlying atmosphere, the focus is on some of the most loved Japanese food in the city.

Barbarini’s Alimentari has been serving authentic Italian cuisine to South Street Seaport diners since 2006. The brick-walled restaurant has a few tiny tables under expansive skylights, which cultivate a bright ambiance framed by rusticity.

DessertTruck, the popular West Village confectionary on wheels dreamed up by a former Le Cirque pastry chef and his Columbia Business School roommate, serves unique dessert combinations all hours of the night from a postal truck retrofitted with a gourmet pastry kitchen.

Located on the Lower East Side, Rayuela is an innovative eatery presenting its own spin on Latin American and Spanish cuisine, referred to as estilo libre latino cuisine.

After closing the original Harry's in 2003, the son of the original owner reopened and revived the space in 2006 by dividing it into two parts: one part formal steakhouse, one part casual café.

Those looking for authentically vibrant South Indian vegetarian cooking will find nirvana at this Curry Hill lunch spot—a no-nonsense joint brightened with neon-pink and bright-orange panels.