Manhattan

Restaurants in Manhattan

Manhattan offers a seemingly infinite number of culinary options, from food stands, famous delis, and its share of celebrity chef restaurants. (Here’s a tip, leave Time Square.)

Internationally renowned restaurant, Eleven Madison Park, brings luxury and creativity to its operations. Tasting menu only dishes are minimalist, allowing the chef to work his magic to create some of the best food in the city. As one of the more popular Manhattan restaurants, be sure to reserve a table at least two months in advance. Momofuku Ko is one of the most unique restaurants in Manhattan serving a seasonal tasting menu with interesting combinations and obscure ingredients. The restaurant is very intimate with only a counter and a dozen stools. Reservations are extremely difficult to get.

Per Se is arguably one of the finest Manhattan restaurants, requiring reservations months in advance. Award winning chef, Thomas Keller, creates world-renowned dishes including tuna tartar with crème fraiche and oysters in tapioca custard. If you’re looking for a reliably good meal at an affordable price head to the East Village, where you can get an incredible pizza at Little Frankie’s, an artisan burger at Brindle Room or a bowl full of soul warming ramen at Momofuku Noodle bar. For dessert, there are a variety spots to meet your needs including the famous Big Gay Ice Cream. Below are more recommendations for some the best restaurants in Manhattan.

Chef Jorge Pareja elevates classic Mexican dishes to new heights at his popular Hell’s Kitchen restaurant. Standout Nouvelle Mexican dishes include lobster and avocado tacos, pomegranate braised skirt steak, and poached artichoke quesadillas.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

Named for the flavor-packed crust that forms on the bottom of the paella pan, this small spot embraces Spanish culinary traditions—from the menu to the long communal tables. One tip: As good as the crispy potatoes, spicy chorizo, and other tapas look, don’t fill up on them.

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.