Manhattan

Hotels in Manhattan

Manhattan hotels range from elegant and storied institutions to modern and swank hotels. The Carlyle Hotel, located in the Upper East Side next to Central Park, is among the grandest hotels in Manhattan. Rooms are furnished with antique furniture and white-gloved operators man the elevators, creating an atmosphere of sophisticated refinement. Stay at the New York City landmark Waldorf Astoria hotel for an old-school elegance. The architecture of the hotel is an Art Deco masterpiece and even with more than 1,000 rooms, the hotel is designed so that no two rooms are the same.

The Gramercy Park Hotel set in a 1920s era property is one of the more glamorous hotels in Manhattan. Over half the rooms are suites and all rooms are decorated with thick velvet upholstery and bold wall art. The hotel bars also serve as galleries for paintings by Andy Warhol. Built in 1904, the St. Regis Hotel is a monument to old New York. Rooms have silk wall coverings and crystal chandeliers and suites are designed by Dior, Tiffany, and Bentley. The Ace Hotel provides a more affordable stay without compromising New York’s particular charm. Its uniquely designed lobby is bustling with an excellent bar, artisan coffee shop. It’s a destination for tourists and natives alike. See below for our top picks for the best hotels in Manhattan.

Opened in September, 2010,  this Modernist addition to SoHo has a permanent art collection and 114 rooms with natural linen bedding and reclaimed-wood floors. We love wall-size murals by area artists.

The Westin New York at Times Square is something of a beacon of calm and respite in one of the world's most bustling landscapes, complete with a beam of light soaring from the atrium to the top of the 45 story building.

With 187 rooms and 23 suites, the Hotel Gansevoort is a stylish resort located in New York’s Meatpacking District.

A stylish classic, the Carlyle gets all the details right—from the chessboard floors and (still-working!) mail chutes to the new Empire Suite, a cashmere-walled, $15,000-a-night duplex designed by Thierry Despont and curated by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

To get a true sense of the brand of luxury the Roosevelt Hotel has exemplified since opening in 1924, guests needn't venture past the lobby, where the gilded molding and columns, domed ceiling, Tiffany crystal chandelier, rich draperies, and balconies suggest a confident, dignified air.

The Millennium UN Plaza Hotel is located at the core of the Big Apple.

Stylish and compact, this former members-only club is a well-designed secret among midtown hotels. The 65 smallish rooms have combed-plaster walls, chocolate-marble showers, and Honduran mahogany accents; TV's placed behind two-way mirrors are clever space-savers.

Housed in a 1927 Beaux-Arts building designed by famed architect Emery Roth, this midtown hotel is located within a mile of Times Square. The high-ceilinged lobby has a marble floor and illuminated columns, while the 209 guestrooms are more basic, designed with a good night’s sleep in mind.

Opened in August 2011, W Hotel’s Lower Manhattan location is on top of the footprint of the old Twin Towers. This 58-story hotel touts all of the amenities that the W brand is known for: signature bed and bathrobes, rainforest shower, and a snack-filled Munchie Box on a whim.

This soaring black monolith on Columbus Circle, with its gold awning that seems to jut out into traffic, isn't the subtlest hotel in town—but then The Donald has never been known for his modesty.

The 300-room Hampton Inn Manhattan-Times Square North sits just minutes from New York’s Broadway theaters and popular attractions such as Rockefeller Center.

Built in 1904 and still gleaming, this Beaux-Arts beauty is a well-polished monument to old New York.

Set in a landmark 17-story Beaux-Arts-style building on Madison Avenue and 76th Street, the 190-room hotel reopened in 2009 following a $60 million top-down restoration led by award-winning designer Lauren Rottet. The result?

Actor-entrepreneur Robert De Niro’s newest addition to his mini TriBeCa empire is his most inviting yet.

With a faux fur–clad lobby, Jetsons-style leather chairs, and mod prints by photographer Guy Bourdin, 6 Columbus presents an opportunity to revel in 1960’s nostalgia.