Manhattan

Hotels in Manhattan

Manhattan hotels range from elegant and storied institutions to modern and swank hotels. The Carlyle Hotel, located in the Upper East Side next to Central Park, is among the grandest hotels in Manhattan. Rooms are furnished with antique furniture and white-gloved operators man the elevators, creating an atmosphere of sophisticated refinement. Stay at the New York City landmark Waldorf Astoria hotel for an old-school elegance. The architecture of the hotel is an Art Deco masterpiece and even with more than 1,000 rooms, the hotel is designed so that no two rooms are the same.

The Gramercy Park Hotel set in a 1920s era property is one of the more glamorous hotels in Manhattan. Over half the rooms are suites and all rooms are decorated with thick velvet upholstery and bold wall art. The hotel bars also serve as galleries for paintings by Andy Warhol. Built in 1904, the St. Regis Hotel is a monument to old New York. Rooms have silk wall coverings and crystal chandeliers and suites are designed by Dior, Tiffany, and Bentley. The Ace Hotel provides a more affordable stay without compromising New York’s particular charm. Its uniquely designed lobby is bustling with an excellent bar, artisan coffee shop. It’s a destination for tourists and natives alike. See below for our top picks for the best hotels in Manhattan.

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

Starting with the Philippe Starck-designed "decompression chamber" upon entry, with its escalator that moves you away from the streets of New York and into a main lobby of hanging ivy and 40-foot ceilings, the Hudson Hotel is art and achitecture combined to offer an escape from the city.

The Mercer's six floor Romanesque-revival style building is a landmark of SoHo. The interior, designed by Christian Liaigre, is accented by dark African wood, subtle colors, and supple leather.

André Balazs understands that stellar views in New York City have less to do with the height of a building than with its context.

This striking, 46-story property is within walking distance of Lower Manhattan neighborhoods such as Greenwich Village and SoHo. Public spaces are dramatically designed: the two-story lobby has Venetian-plaster columns and discreet leather seating.

The 201-room Tribeca Grand is significantly smaller than its SoHo sister property, but you wouldn't know it from the hotel's soaring atrium, eight stories tall and naturally illuminated thanks to translucent skylights.

Intimate, elegant, and authentically Villagey, the Abingdon occupies two adjacent, refurbished 18th-century Federal town houses in the heart of the West Village.

A modern interpretation of a British gentlemen’s club, the Blakely hotel is situated in midtown west, just a short walk from Central Park and Broadway. Inside, the lobby is furnished with Persian rugs, worn leather couches, and bookshelves lined with Charles Dickens classics.

As sumptuous and plush as the Four Seasons (a few blocks away) is slick and modern, the popular MO occupies the 35th through the 54th floors of the Time Warner Center at the southwest corner of Central Park.

The 1,980-room Hilton New York generates much of its electric power and hot water from a PureCell power system, the only one of its kind in a New York City hotel.

Located less than two miles from the Empire State Building, Times Square, New York University, Madison Square Garden and more, Four Points by Sheraton is at the heart of exciting, fast-paced Manhattan.  Along with spacious and comfortable accommodations, Four Points by Sheraton has a fitness cent

Of the same vintage as the neighboring St. Regis (both hotels were built between 1904 and 1905), the Peninsula has retained its decorative Beaux-Arts façade—but inside, old-world grandeur meets streamlined modernity.

Ace

Located on 29th Street in a historic building dating back to 1904, the Ace Hotel rises 12 stories above Midtown Manhattan. The hotel boasts 260 guest rooms, many of which have vintage furniture and views of Broadway.

The city’s second property from Hyatt’s boutique brand—located directly across from the New York Public Library—has 184 loftlike guest rooms with 12-foot floor-to-ceiling windows and muted interiors by designer Tony Chi.

This trendsetting refuge for downtown movers and shakers still has as much élan as it did when it opened in 1996.