Manhattan

Hotels in Manhattan

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

One of the most anticipated new hotels in the city, the Mondrian SoHo opened its 270 rooms in February 2011. It’s an odd mix of 18th-century elegance and postmodern New Yawk—designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz said he was inspired by Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête.

Set on the Lower East Side's main thoroughfare, this 22-room brick guesthouse—originally built as a tenement in 1879—perfectly embodies its quirky, eclectic home neighborhood.

Part private members’ club and part hotel, the Soho House is located inside a repurposed warehouse building in New York’s Meatpacking District.

Hoteliers Sean MacPherson and Eric Goode—the team behind New York’s Maritime Hotel—are breathing new life into Manhattan’s once-desolate Bowery with their 135-room Bowery Hotel.

One of the city’s first boutique hotels, Morgans was established by Studio 54 cofounder Ian Schrager in 1984. Renovated in 2008, the Murray Hill hotel juxtaposes a Renaissance-style façade with a contemporary interior by celebrated French designer Andrée Putnam.

Located in midtown Manhattan just steps from Times Square and Broadway, Hotel Edison was built in 1931 in the same art deco style as Radio City Music Hall. Today, the former depression era hotel welcomes guests into its guest rooms, which offer a neutral palate in shades of tan and brown.

It didn't reinvent New York's downtown hotel scene the way the Soho Grand and the Mercer did—it came later, in 2001—but this hyperdesigned, esoteric 97-room enclave has still managed to up the exclusivity ante in an already exclusive neighborhood.

Located one block from Penn Station, steps from Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen, and the Meatpacking District, this is Kimpton’s fourth Big Apple hotel. Black-and-white photography, and pencil sketches curated by Irish interior designer Colum McCartan, gives a museum-like quality to this sky rise.

Let the Marmara Manhattan hotel serve as home base during your stay in New York.

Raising the opulence bar—even for a Four Seasons property—this soaring, sleek, I. M. Pei-designed tower epitomizes the cool high life in this coolest of American cities.

While the Jane, designed by Sean MacPherson (the Bowery Hotel, the Maritime Hotel), is romantic in theory—an old riverfront building with tiny rooms modeled after European train sleeper cars—keep in mind that a New York hotel with starting rates in the double digits comes with drawbacks.

André Balazs understands that stellar views in New York City have less to do with the height of a building than with its context.

Starting with the Philippe Starck-designed "decompression chamber" upon entry, with its escalator that moves you away from the streets of New York and into a main lobby of hanging ivy and 40-foot ceilings, the Hudson Hotel is art and achitecture combined to offer an escape from the city.