Manhattan

Hotels in Manhattan

Manhattan hotels range from elegant and storied institutions to modern and swank hotels. The Carlyle Hotel, located in the Upper East Side next to Central Park, is among the grandest hotels in Manhattan. Rooms are furnished with antique furniture and white-gloved operators man the elevators, creating an atmosphere of sophisticated refinement. Stay at the New York City landmark Waldorf Astoria hotel for an old-school elegance. The architecture of the hotel is an Art Deco masterpiece and even with more than 1,000 rooms, the hotel is designed so that no two rooms are the same.

The Gramercy Park Hotel set in a 1920s era property is one of the more glamorous hotels in Manhattan. Over half the rooms are suites and all rooms are decorated with thick velvet upholstery and bold wall art. The hotel bars also serve as galleries for paintings by Andy Warhol. Built in 1904, the St. Regis Hotel is a monument to old New York. Rooms have silk wall coverings and crystal chandeliers and suites are designed by Dior, Tiffany, and Bentley. The Ace Hotel provides a more affordable stay without compromising New York’s particular charm. Its uniquely designed lobby is bustling with an excellent bar, artisan coffee shop. It’s a destination for tourists and natives alike. See below for our top picks for the best hotels in Manhattan.

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

Starting with the Philippe Starck-designed "decompression chamber" upon entry, with its escalator that moves you away from the streets of New York and into a main lobby of hanging ivy and 40-foot ceilings, the Hudson Hotel is art and achitecture combined to offer an escape from the city.

The Mercer's six floor Romanesque-revival style building is a landmark of SoHo. The interior, designed by Christian Liaigre, is accented by dark African wood, subtle colors, and supple leather.

André Balazs understands that stellar views in New York City have less to do with the height of a building than with its context.

When design partners Ian Schrager and Julian Schnabel unveiled their reimagined, ultraswanky Gramercy Park Hotel in winter 2006, it brought modern glamour back to this 1925-era property.

Behind the red-brick and limestone façade of the Algonquin, William Faulker penned his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Orson Welles honeymooned, and The New Yorker was born.

Popular among student travelers and Columbia-visiting academics, this upper-Broadway hotel offers a surprising amount of comfort and style for an affordable price.

Opened in September, 2010,  this Modernist addition to SoHo has a permanent art collection and 114 rooms with natural linen bedding and reclaimed-wood floors. We love wall-size murals by area artists.

Taking its cue from the Ikea school of cheap chic, this youth-oriented urban hotel isn't for everyone. But its 347 tiny, clean, cleverly designed rooms—very mod, with stainless-steel sinks and Eames-inspired desk chairs—are a blessing for anyone visiting New York on a budget.

This striking, 46-story property is within walking distance of Lower Manhattan neighborhoods such as Greenwich Village and SoHo. Public spaces are dramatically designed: the two-story lobby has Venetian-plaster columns and discreet leather seating.

The 201-room Tribeca Grand is significantly smaller than its SoHo sister property, but you wouldn't know it from the hotel's soaring atrium, eight stories tall and naturally illuminated thanks to translucent skylights.

Intimate, elegant, and authentically Villagey, the Abingdon occupies two adjacent, refurbished 18th-century Federal town houses in the heart of the West Village.

This iconic Park Avenue hotel is located in midtown, just two blocks from Central Park. Inside, the high-ceilinged lobby is decorated with marble pillars and oversize armchairs, while the 354 guest rooms contain silk wallpaper, granite-top desks, and doeskin bathrobes.

The Pierre, A Taj Hotel, New York refreshes the luxury and exclusivity that have long defined the hotel.