Manhattan

Hotels in Manhattan

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

Raising the opulence bar—even for a Four Seasons property—this soaring, sleek, I. M. Pei-designed tower epitomizes the cool high life in this coolest of American cities.

To get a true sense of the brand of luxury the Roosevelt Hotel has exemplified since opening in 1924, guests needn't venture past the lobby, where the gilded molding and columns, domed ceiling, Tiffany crystal chandelier, rich draperies, and balconies suggest a confident, dignified air.

The hotel also rents out apartments that run from $3,500 to $12,000 per month.

Ace

Located on 29th Street in a historic building dating back to 1904, the Ace Hotel rises 12 stories above Midtown Manhattan. The hotel boasts 260 guest rooms, many of which have vintage furniture and views of Broadway.

The Mercer's six floor Romanesque-revival style building is a landmark of SoHo. The interior, designed by Christian Liaigre, is accented by dark African wood, subtle colors, and supple leather.

When design partners Ian Schrager and Julian Schnabel unveiled their reimagined, ultraswanky Gramercy Park Hotel in winter 2006, it brought modern glamour back to this 1925-era property.

Accessed via an private entrance off 50th Street, the Waldorf Towers hotel occupies floors 27 through 42 of the famed Waldorf=Astoria, an Art Deco landmark constructed in 1931.

One of the most anticipated new hotels in the city, the Mondrian SoHo opened its 270 rooms in February 2011. It’s an odd mix of 18th-century elegance and postmodern New Yawk—designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz said he was inspired by Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête.

Taking its cue from the Ikea school of cheap chic, this youth-oriented urban hotel isn't for everyone. But its 347 tiny, clean, cleverly designed rooms—very mod, with stainless-steel sinks and Eames-inspired desk chairs—are a blessing for anyone visiting New York on a budget.

Housed in a 1927 Beaux-Arts building designed by famed architect Emery Roth, this midtown hotel is located within a mile of Times Square. The high-ceilinged lobby has a marble floor and illuminated columns, while the 209 guestrooms are more basic, designed with a good night’s sleep in mind.

Located in midtown Manhattan just steps from Times Square and Broadway, Hotel Edison was built in 1931 in the same art deco style as Radio City Music Hall. Today, the former depression era hotel welcomes guests into its guest rooms, which offer a neutral palate in shades of tan and brown.

The 201-room Tribeca Grand is significantly smaller than its SoHo sister property, but you wouldn't know it from the hotel's soaring atrium, eight stories tall and naturally illuminated thanks to translucent skylights.

Andre Balazs has made frugality fun at this whimsical Times Square address.

Once a 1930s hangout for the likes of Fred Astaire, Irving Berlin, and John Barrymore, the Lambs Club, originally designed by Beaux-Arts architect Stanford White, has been reinvented as the new 83-room Chatwal.