Hotels in Manhattan

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

Raising the opulence bar—even for a Four Seasons property—this soaring, sleek, I. M. Pei-designed tower epitomizes the cool high life in this coolest of American cities.

Opened in September, 2010,  this Modernist addition to SoHo has a permanent art collection and 114 rooms with natural linen bedding and reclaimed-wood floors. We love wall-size murals by area artists.

Set on the Lower East Side's main thoroughfare, this 22-room brick guesthouse—originally built as a tenement in 1879—perfectly embodies its quirky, eclectic home neighborhood.

This striking, 46-story property is within walking distance of Lower Manhattan neighborhoods such as Greenwich Village and SoHo. Public spaces are dramatically designed: the two-story lobby has Venetian-plaster columns and discreet leather seating.

Taking its cue from the Ikea school of cheap chic, this youth-oriented urban hotel isn't for everyone. But its 347 tiny, clean, cleverly designed rooms—very mod, with stainless-steel sinks and Eames-inspired desk chairs—are a blessing for anyone visiting New York on a budget.

Urban chic is the theme at this Midtown Manhattan hotel, developed by hotelier Vikram Chatwal. The lobby boasts whimsical chandeliers and 18,000-gallon fish tank, while the compact guest rooms are decorated in shades of gray and burnt orange.

The Palm Court's famed stained-glass ceiling was re-created pane-for-pane with the help of New York City's Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants' first New York outpost, set in quiet, largely residential Murray Hill, may not exactly have the sexiest location, but it's one of the city's better-kept secrets: a mid-priced, boutique-size hotel with the same style and amenities as those in the $$$$ range.

A cross between a bed and breakfast (except there’s no breakfast) and a hostel, East Village Bed & Coffee is the creation of Anne Edris. Since Edris has lived in the neighborhood for nearly 24 years, she provides a wealth of information for out-of-towners on the best local dives and sights.

Attracting a steady flow of celebrities (like its Meatpacking District sibling), this NoMad (north of Madison Square Park) hotel is within easy walking distance of Union Square, the Theatre District, and the Empire State Building. Throughout the 249-room hotel, décor makes a statement.

While the Jane, designed by Sean MacPherson (the Bowery Hotel, the Maritime Hotel), is romantic in theory—an old riverfront building with tiny rooms modeled after European train sleeper cars—keep in mind that a New York hotel with starting rates in the double digits comes with drawbacks.