Hotels in Manhattan

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

In a landmark building on the Upper East Side, The Mark has been reimagined by French designer Jacques Grange as a soigné retreat. The striking black-and-white, Op Art lobby announces this is no longer a frumpy enclave for ladies who lunch.

With a faux fur–clad lobby, Jetsons-style leather chairs, and mod prints by photographer Guy Bourdin, 6 Columbus presents an opportunity to revel in 1960’s nostalgia.

Most people don't think of midtown Manhattan as a place to chill out—but don't tell the Shoreham, a 177-room hotel that resembles a chic spa retreat.

Part private members’ club and part hotel, the Soho House is located inside a repurposed warehouse building in New York’s Meatpacking District.

Situated between Lincoln Center and Central Park, this hotel has 422 units, all of which have floor-to-ceiling windows to let in the best views. Although somewhat small, guest rooms are comfortable with with rich earth tones, brass accents, and subtle animal prints.

Instantly recognizable by the large red “WJ” marking the front entrance, the six-story Washington Jefferson Hotel is located within a 10-minute walk of Times Square, Central Park, and the theatre district.

Situated in the 1926 Taft Hotel building, a 22-story Spanish Renaissance—style structure on Seventh Avenue, this Italian-inspired hotel is just a four-minute walk from Times Square.

Situated directly across from Central Park in the center of midtown Manhattan, this grand-scale boutique hotel has a sumptuous feel, from its opulent lobby that was modeled after the Vatican Library to its intricate mosaic floors and manned elevators.

Set in a landmark 17-story Beaux-Arts-style building on Madison Avenue and 76th Street, the 190-room hotel reopened in 2009 following a $60 million top-down restoration led by award-winning designer Lauren Rottet. The result?

André Balazs understands that stellar views in New York City have less to do with the height of a building than with its context.

Although nonbibliophiles may find it a tad precious, it's hard not to be charmed by the schtick of this bookish hotel.