Manhattan

Things to do in Manhattan

At only 30 square miles, Manhattan is a fairly small area to explore, but there are so many things to do in Manhattan you will have a hard time fitting everything in. For art lovers, Manhattan hosts some of the world’s best art museums. For modern art, check out the Museum of Modern Art or the architecturally distinctive Guggenheim Museum, always showcasing amazing special exhibitions. The hallmark New York Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Met, is also a must-see site containing 19 curatorial departments ranging from ancient Egyptian to Asian to European masters. For a different type of art, check out a world famous Broadway show, but make sure to reserve your tickets early because many shows tend to sell out.

Wondering what to do in Manhattan other than art? Try taking a boat cruise through the New York Harbor to Ellis Island and see the iconic Statue of Liberty. Also, one of the top things to do in Manhattan is catching a view of the spectacular city skyline from the Empire State Building or Top of the Rock. If you’re wondering what to do in Manhattan for families, many museum such as the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and the Museum of the Moving Image offer hands-on activities for kids and the New York Hall of Science has a 30,000 square foot outdoor science playground. If the weather is nice, take a stroll through one of Manhattan’s many incredible public parks including Central Park, Washington Square Park or the High Line in Chelsea.

Searching for a place to house a museum honoring American immigrants, Ruth Abram unearthed 97 Orchard Street, a historic apartment building that was completed in 1863 and sheltered almost 7,000 immigrants over the years.

The boutique carries groovy clothes and shoes from across the decades. The real gems are on the second floor.

Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael Cunningham called this "one of the greatest bookstores on the face of the Earth" for its friendly atmosphere and well-read personnel (staff favorites are displayed up front, along with noteworthy new books).

Unless you live in the neighborhood, it’s a bit of hike to this Washington Heights wine shop—but you’ll thank your feet for it. Owner Peter Yi’s mission is clear: to offer the best wines from around the world at competitive prices.

Steeped in an 80 year tradition of fine printing, Mrs. John L. Strong sells exquisite stationery and accessories.

Located in the Meatpacking District, Ajna (nee Buddha) Bar serves cocktails, appetizers, entrees, and sushi in an opium den-like setting, complete with red chandeliers, cloth couches, and a bamboo tunnel decorated with Buddha statuettes. The walls feature gold murals and Chinese calligraphy.

The Paula Cooper gallery in Chelsea is known for showing minimalist and conceptual art. Inside the industrial, chalk-blue building, a large open space is filled with white walls, a light grey floor, and a flood of natural light from the skylight and high ceilings.

Combining effortlessly unencumbered minimalism with the subtle beauty of a polished concrete floor and curving acrylic walls, the Derek Lam boutique in downtown New York City is a signature sanaa design.

The 77-story masterpiece of Art Deco architecture and detail.

Housed inside a revitalized building constructed by Oscar Hammerstein in 1900, the New Victory Theater is New York City’s premier theater for young people and their families. The theater strives to maintain affordable prices, making its productions accessible to a wide audience.

Boasting the world’s first Cigar Aficionado smoking lounge, Cigar Inn is located in the Midtown East neighborhood, and it’s easy to find if you just look for the decorated Native American statue standing out front.

The well-edited, mint-condition The well-edited, mint-condition vintage clothing at always feels just right, particularly the garden-party frocks from the ’40s and ’50s.