Manhattan

Things to do in Manhattan

At only 30 square miles, Manhattan is a fairly small area to explore, but there are so many things to do in Manhattan you will have a hard time fitting everything in. For art lovers, Manhattan hosts some of the world’s best art museums. For modern art, check out the Museum of Modern Art or the architecturally distinctive Guggenheim Museum, always showcasing amazing special exhibitions. The hallmark New York Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Met, is also a must-see site containing 19 curatorial departments ranging from ancient Egyptian to Asian to European masters. For a different type of art, check out a world famous Broadway show, but make sure to reserve your tickets early because many shows tend to sell out.

Wondering what to do in Manhattan other than art? Try taking a boat cruise through the New York Harbor to Ellis Island and see the iconic Statue of Liberty. Also, one of the top things to do in Manhattan is catching a view of the spectacular city skyline from the Empire State Building or Top of the Rock. If you’re wondering what to do in Manhattan for families, many museum such as the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and the Museum of the Moving Image offer hands-on activities for kids and the New York Hall of Science has a 30,000 square foot outdoor science playground. If the weather is nice, take a stroll through one of Manhattan’s many incredible public parks including Central Park, Washington Square Park or the High Line in Chelsea.

This home décor store is the kind of place you can get lost in for hours. Every inch of space (ceiling included) is overflowing with charming gift-worthy items, such as brightly colored Yves Delorme mohair throws, owl-shaped salt and pepper shakers, and Savon de Marseille soaps.

Founded by expat Peter Myers and his wife, Irene, in 1985, Myers of Keswick is an English grocery store located in the West Village.

From Mandy Oser, of Le Bernardin, comes this trendy wine and food bar serving mineral-driven wines and a menu of innovative small plates.

Window displays packed full of furry stuffed animals, wooden play sets, and handmade clothes draw those young and young at heart into this East Village shop. In 1983, five ladies joined together to open Dinosaur Hill, providing alternatives to the increasing number of electronic toys.

As the city’s first eco-friendly nightclub, Greenhouse offers a “green” place for Manhattan partiers to dance the night away. The venue has water- and energy-efficient features such as LED light bulbs that use one-thirtieth of the energy burned by regular incandescent bulbs.

The hullabaloo over MoMA's $600 million makeover in 2005 (and $20 admission fee) has overshadowed how impressive its collection truly is.

When Marco Pasanella purchased this 19th-century sail-making factory in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport, he used the street level space to realize his dream: a Tuscan oasis integrating the best elements of work, play, and family.

Known for her hand-engraved stationery, Nancy Sharon Collins, Stationer, has more than 30 years of experience in engraving with monogram-and-type styles from the 1920s and 1930s.

An airy, minimalist window-lined store that started as a Hamptons staple, it carries designers for men (Rag & Bone, Rogues Gallery) and women (Zac Posen, Jill Stuart), and attracts a wide array of buyers, including celebrities.

Appellation Wine and Spirits is the place to buy organic and biodynamic products in Chelsea; in fact, nearly all of the 250 wines stocked carry one of these labels.

Those who prefer the coziness and atmosphere of independent bookstores over the “big box” ones should check out Shakespeare & Co. Booksellers at 716 Broadway, a brownstone storefront whose name is emblazoned in glided capital letters.

If you are a fan of documentaries, the Maysles Cinema more than delivers.