Manhattan

Things to do in Manhattan

At only 30 square miles, Manhattan is a fairly small area to explore, but there are so many things to do in Manhattan you will have a hard time fitting everything in. For art lovers, Manhattan hosts some of the world’s best art museums. For modern art, check out the Museum of Modern Art or the architecturally distinctive Guggenheim Museum, always showcasing amazing special exhibitions. The hallmark New York Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Met, is also a must-see site containing 19 curatorial departments ranging from ancient Egyptian to Asian to European masters. For a different type of art, check out a world famous Broadway show, but make sure to reserve your tickets early because many shows tend to sell out.

Wondering what to do in Manhattan other than art? Try taking a boat cruise through the New York Harbor to Ellis Island and see the iconic Statue of Liberty. Also, one of the top things to do in Manhattan is catching a view of the spectacular city skyline from the Empire State Building or Top of the Rock. If you’re wondering what to do in Manhattan for families, many museum such as the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and the Museum of the Moving Image offer hands-on activities for kids and the New York Hall of Science has a 30,000 square foot outdoor science playground. If the weather is nice, take a stroll through one of Manhattan’s many incredible public parks including Central Park, Washington Square Park or the High Line in Chelsea.

If you love truly unique children’s threads that haven't been mass-produced and shipped to just about every major retailer, check out Estella between West 13th and 12th Streets.

Evoking the comforting atmosphere of a home kitchen, this West Village bakery contains a fireplace, bright blue tiled tables, and glass jars filled with freshly baked cookies.

Part wine bar and part winery, City Winery was founded by Michael Dorf, also responsible for New York’s famous Knitting Factory, as a space that would combine his love of both wine and music.

Overlooking a bend of the Harlem River in Upper Manhattan’s Inwood area, Swindler Cove Park is a relatively new five-acre park. Once an illegal dumping site, the area was cleaned up and opened to the public in 2003.

Serving what are, arguably, some of New York City’s best bagels, Absolute Bagels is a small, unassuming shop on the city’s famed Upper West Side.

Opened in 1985, Grace’s was the first gourmet food market in the Upper East Side. The store’s namesake, Grace Balducci Doria, grew up helping her parents run their shop in Greenwich Village and continued the family tradition with her husband by establishing their own small business.

It's not the ambiance that brings crowds to this art-house cinema in the West Village—the seats are rock-hard and undersized and the facility years past a refresh. With its three small theaters often jam-packed, there's little question as to what provides the draw.

Citizens of the style world decorate their dining rooms with finds from this tiny shop full of artfully stacked minimalist china, jewel-like tea sets, and cheery place settings. Everything is casually elegant and classic but of-the-moment and, in most cases, surprisingly affordable.

In summer, the hottest neo-burlesque revue is at the 350-seat Spiegeltent, under the Brooklyn Bridge.

Quality over quantity is the ruling principle at this diminutive wine shop, opened in late 2005 by husband-and-wife team Steve Flynn and Shelly McClure.

Distinct among Chelsea galleries for its decidedly international scope, James Cohan Gallery represents some well-known names (such as the estate of Robert Smithson) and a growing roster of newly famous and up-and-coming contemporary artists, including Roxy Paine and Nam June Paik.

Named for the goddess of the agave plant, Mayahuel in the East Village offers a mix of traditional and modern Mexican cuisine and fine mescals and tequilas from Mexico as well as cocktails.