Restaurants in Maine

What started as a simple jam enterprise for Jonathan King and Jim Stott in 1991 blossomed into a culinary empire that includes a cooking school, and as of 2003, a café.

Hidden far off the beaten path—at the end of a country road in South Harpswell, this family-run marina-side restaurant may appear nondescript, but its fish chowder is a well-guarded local secret.

Located in the coastal fishing village after which it's named, Five Island specializes in fresh-caught crustaceans. There's no indoor seating; snag a picnic table on the dock overlooking the sea, and watch as the lobster boats come in and out of the harbor.

When chef Lee Skawinski travels around Italy each year, he's not just sourcing recipes.

This red building, situated on a stretch of land between City Cove and Haley Pond, previously housed an IGA grocery store and, in 1958, even a co-ed sauna.

Co-owner and James Beard Award–winning chef Melissa Kelly drew on two influences when she opened her Italian restaurant in this renovated 1880s Victorian in 2000.

This self-proclaimed “fine casual dining” establishment in the cozy western Maine hamlet of Bethel is open for dinner and Sunday brunch. During the warmer months, S.S. Milton features a patio with a white fence, flowers, and green umbrellas.

Seven miles from U.S. Route 1 (turnoff opposite Moody’s Diner) is a Teutonic gourmand paradise. Founded in 1918, this friendly family-run operation—where it appears to be Christmas all year round—does a brisk business in delicious edible products from Deutschland.

 There’s comfort food, and then there’s Duckfat. When owner-chef Rob Evans opened this friendly all-day café just down the street from his more sophisticated restaurant, Hugo’s, in 2006, locals could not believe their taste buds—nor Evans’s near-obscene use of its namesake ingredient.

This seasonal oceanside restaurant, which is affiliated with Spinney's cottages and guesthouse, serves lobsters straight from the tank with drawn butter and bibs.

One whiff of the hickory wood–smoked BBQ, and you’ll be seduced by this roadhouse restaurant, one mile south of downtown Freeport.

Pine Tree is a summertime favorite for ice cream on quaint Main Street in Rangeley. People line up to the powder blue building and fill up outdoor picnic tables to enjoy the shop's selection of Gifford’s brand scoops in flavors like French vanilla, coffee, and mint chocolate chip.

For 50 years, the Stacy family has been serving up some of America's best dogs from this ramshackle, cabin-like red shed in Maine. The franks come steamed and are served with some very special relish—in fact, it's this now-famous condiment that keeps customers coming back.

This instant institution has been open along Highway One since 1983. The low-slung white building with a blue awning flies a series of flags along the roof, including the U.S., Canada, and of course Maine.