Maine

Restaurants in Maine

The riverfront, monolithic brick Fort Andross Mill—which turned out countless bolts of cotton broadcloth in the 1800s and then for years stood derelict—has become one of the state’s great mixed-use spaces: antiques dealers, gallerists, and a new breed of restaurateurs all share the renovated buil

This massive red-roofed building remains open daily throughout out the year (with truncated hours from Mother's Day to Columbus Day) and specializes in creek-front lobster feasts.

This Little Cranberry Island restaurant, with a gray wood frame and a sizeable patio, rests on pylons along Hadlock Cove, offering views of the boats and ships as they navigate the rippling water of Cranberry Harbor.

Dine on fresh seafood cioppino with fresh-caught fish or jumbo baked lobster.

The secret to owner-chef Sam Hayward’s success is his honest, earthbound cooking. And his temple to simply prepared food is Fore Street—a cavernous warehouse space that miraculously manages to feel homey, thanks to old barn wood, worn leather booths, and an all-around lived-in patina.

Chefs/partners Mark (“M”) Gaier and Clark (“C”) Frasier of the esteemed Ogunquit restaurant Arrows opened this seaside bistro in quaint Perkins Cove in 2006—welcome news for locals and out-of-staters who want to sample their cuisine (and produce from the duo’s renowned garden) but not spend a for

Eclectic, organic foods are the specialty at this downtown Brunswick restaurant serving everything from Cuban shrimp to beef Brisket. The interior is simple but inviting, with white tablecloths, squash-yellow walls, and framed artwork throughout.

The centerpiece of Maine’s top-rated inn—its famed white barn with wide-plank floors and soaring exposed beams—is where Brit expat executive chef Jonathan Cartwright weaves a culinary tapestry of Maine-inspired American and European dishes.

This tantalizingly retro white cement block of a restaurant enjoys a great waterside location off Commercial Street. Simply emblazoned on the outside with a bright blue J, this lively sports bar has been a favorite hangout since 1978, and not much has changed, including the staff.

Live and cooked lobsters are the draw at this low-key waterfront seafood shack, operated by the nation's oldest fishermen's cooperative.

This central Maine institution has been located along the Wiscasset waterfront since 1954, and before that, in nearby Boothby, beginning in 1938. The shack with the red and white awning rests next to Route 1 and specializes in lobster rolls.

Maine’s Mid Coast hides some of its best secrets on the “reaches”: long, narrow peninsulas that stretch like fingers into the sea. The sleepy Harpswell peninsula is just a half-hour’s detour off I-295, yet it could be 200 miles away.

Now one of six regional locations, the original Wild Willy’s began serving its signature handmade burgers in 2001.